Lectures of George Thompson: With a Full Report of the Discussion Between Mr. Thompson and Mr. Borthwick, the Pro-slavery Agent, Held at the Royal Amphitheatre, Liverpool, Eng., and which Continued for Six Evenings with Unabated Interest, Comp. from Various English Editions. Also, a Brief History of His Connection with the Anti-slavery Cause in England, by Wm. Lloyd Garrison

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Page 167 - If thou forbear to deliver them that are drawn unto death, and those that are ready to be slain ; if thou sayest, "Behold, we knew it not;" doth not he that pondereth the heart consider it? and he that keepeth thy soul, doth not he know it? and shall not he render to every man according to his works?
Page 59 - Art thou called being a servant '( care not for it : but if thou mayest be made free, use it rather.
Page 75 - ... do unto others as they would that others should do unto them...
Page 58 - Take care of him; and whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come again, I will repay thee.
Page 58 - And likewise a Levite, when he was at the place, came and looked on him, and passed by on the other side.
Page x - And God said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven.
Page 56 - Moreover of the children of the strangers that do sojourn among you, of them shall ye buy, and of their families that are with you, which they begat in your land : and they shall be your possession. And ye shall take them as an inheritance for your children after you, to inherit them for a possession; they shall be your bondmen for ever: but over your brethren the children of Israel, ye shall not rule one over another with rigour.
Page 58 - And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.
Page 77 - Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then, And let it circulate through every vein Of all your empire ; that, where Britain's power Is felt, mankind may feel her mercy too.
Page 46 - Tell me not of rights — talk not of the property of the planter in his slaves. I deny the right — I acknowledge not the property. The principles, the feelings of our common nature, rise in rebellion against it. Be the appeal made to the understanding or to the heart, the sentence is the same that rejects it.

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