Geographic Travels in Central Australia from 1872 to 1874

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author, 1875 - Australia - 223 pages
Brief contacts with natives on expeditions; Musgrave Ranges, Mann Range, MacDonnell Ranges, Glen Edith, Lake Amadeus, Mount Destruction, Mount Olga.

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Page 129 - And that there is all nature cries aloud Through all her works, he must delight in virtue ; And that which he delights in must be happy. But when, or where ? This world was made for Caesar.
Page 144 - O'er all there hung a shadow and a fear, A sense of mystery the spirit daunted, And said, as plain as whisper in the ear, The place is haunted...
Page 83 - The morn is up again, the dewy morn, With breath all incense, and with cheek all bloom, Laughing the clouds away with playful scorn, And living as if earth contain'd no tomb, — And glowing into day...
Page 92 - ... creation, permitted a fiat to be recorded, that the beings whom, it was His pleasure in the first instance to place amidst these lovely scenes, must eventually be swept from the face of the earth by others more intellectual, more dearly beloved and gifted than they. Progressive improvement is undoubtedly the order of creation, and we perhaps in our turn may be as ruthlessly driven from the earth by another race of yet unknown beings, of an order infinitely higher, infinitely more beloved, than...
Page 78 - In the Spring, when the wattle gold trembles Twixt shadow and shine, When each dew-laden air draught resembles A long draught of wine; When the sky-line's blue burnish'd resistance Makes deeper the dreamiest distance, Some song in all hearts hath existence,— Such songs have been mine.
Page 191 - He had left me a little over two gallons of water in one keg, and it may be imagined how glad I was to get a drink. I could have drunk my whole supply in half an hour, but was compelled to economy, for I could not tell how many days would elapse before assistance could come : it could not be less than five, it might be many more. After quenching my thirst a little I felt ravenously hungry, and on searching among the bags, all the food I could find was eleven sticks of dirty, sandy, smoked horse,...
Page 190 - I then said — for I couldn't speak before — " Look here, Gibson, you see we are in a most terrible fix with only one horse, therefore only one can ride, and one must remain behind. I shall remain : and now listen to me. If the mare does not get water soon she will die; therefore ride right on ; get to the Kegs, if possible, to-night, and give her water. Now...
Page 188 - I did not think of it, when my mare came up straight to it, and took it in her teeth, forcing out the cork and sending the water up (which we were both dying to drink) in a beautiful jet, which, descending to the earth, was irrevocably lost. We had now only a pint or so left. Gibson was sorry he had exchanged Badger...
Page 192 - I almost gave up the thought of walking any farther, for the exertion in this dreadful region, where the triodia was almost as high as myself, and as thick as it could grow, was quite overpowering, and being starved, I felt quite light-headed. After sitting down, on every occasion when I tried to get up again, my head would swim round, and I would fall down oblivious for some time. Being in a chronic state of burning thirst, my general plight was dreadful in the extreme. A bare and level sandy waste...
Page 186 - ... splendid bay horse and fine weight-carrier, with a pair of water-bags that contained twenty gallons at starting. The other horse was Darkie, a fine, strong, nuggetty-black horse, who carried two five-gallon kegs of water and our stock of smoked horse, rugs, &c. We reached the Circus, at twenty miles, early, and the horses had time to feed and fill themselves after being watered, though the grass was very poor.

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