Page images
PDF
EPUB

TABLE 2.-Showing branches of study pursued and the pupils pursuing each branch in

city systems of schools having manual training-Continued.

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

14

[blocks in formation]

Y.

36

[blocks in formation]

Jamestown, N. Y.. 2, 257
2,257 Drawing, primary kin-

18
dergarten, and other

work.
Drawing, advanced kin-

dergarten, sewing, and

other work. Mechanioal drawing, the

2
use of tools, carpentry,

and joinery.
Sewing, mending, darn.

2
ing, etc., and cooking.
Printing

1 Lansingburgh, N. 700 Drawing

1 special

and
ola88

teachers.
Clay modeling.

1 special

and 16
cla 88

teachers.
Stick laying.

Working in wood. Mt. Vernon, N.Y.. 480 Industrial drawing

1 Use of wood-working

1 tools. Newburgh, N. Y... 2, 400 Drawing..

69 Carpentry

1 Sewing

1 New York, NY... 12, 806 Drawing.

29 special

and the
class

teachers.
Paper folding and cut. Class
ting.

teachers. Clay modeling..

...do .... Shop-work

4 Sewing

5 Cooking

2 Olean, N. Y. 25 Carpentry

1 Tideoute, Pa.. 90 Mechanical drawing.

1 Carpentry ...

1 Wood turning

1 Iron forging

1 Sewing.

1 West Chester, Pa.. 75 Wood work

1 Wilkes Barre, Pa.. 65 | Joinery..

1 Sewing

10 Knoxville, Tenn., 223 Carpentry.

1 Slater Training Priuting

1 School). Sewing

1 Cooking

1 Honsekeeping

1 Appleton, Wis., 24 Industrial drawing.

1 (High School). Shop work...

1 La Crosse, Wis .... 4,500 | Drawing, clay modeling,

81
stick laying, paper cut-
ting and folding, paste.
board, leather, and

wood work.
Kau Cla:re, Wis.... 75 | Mechanical drawing.

1 Carpentry

1 Iron forging..

1 Wood carving

1

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

a Average.

TABLE 3.-Showing grades in which manual training is given and time devoted to it in city

systems.

[blocks in formation]

Do.

c1

[ocr errors]

mar.

Oskaloosa, Iowa....... Sewing

Primary and Grammar..

1 3 hours. Cooking .do

1 Do. Hyde Park, Mass...... Carpentry

Upper grammar

2 2 hours. Sewing Lower grammar.

a 1, 6 2 | 19 hours. Springfield, Mass.... Drawing.

Senior grammar

1
Joinery...
High school....

2

Do.
Wood turning
do...

5 Do. Waltham, Mass Drawing...

First to twelfth, inclu. cl-12 | 1 hour.

sive.
Carpentry ....
Seventh to ninth, inclu.

1 11 hours.
sive.
Sewing .....
Third toninth, inclusive.

1 hour. Albany (High School), Industrial drawing .

All .....

5-3 | 15 to 30 min. N. Y.

utes.
Carpentry
.do ...

2 40 minutes. Winchester, Mass.... .do

Teuth to twelfth

2 d 2.
Cooking
Eighth to thirteenth.

1 bour.
Sewing
Fourth to sixth....

2 45 minutes. Muskegon, Mich ..... Printing

Seventh and eighth.

2-5 | 20 minutes. Minneapolis, Minn Industrial drawing .. First two years.,

5 | 40 minutes. General woodworking First year and half of

5 80 minutes. high school. Wood carving, turning, Second and third years .

5 Do. polishing Stillwater (High | Woodwork

High school

4 1 hour. School), Minn. Concord, N. H.. Carpentry .......

Grammar..

1

2 hours. Elizabeth, N. J.... Drawing and designing All grades...

1 30 to 40 min.

utes.
Clay modeling
Second primary..

1

35 minutes. Paper cutting and making. First primary and el 40 minntes.

fourth grammar.
Carpentry
Second and third gram-

1 50 minutes.
Sewing ...
....do

1 55 minutes. Montclair, V.J.... Development of geomet. | Sixth

2 | 1 hour.
ric forms.
Clay rnodeling
Sixth..

2 Do.
Carpentry ..
Seventh

2 Do.
Wood carving
Eighth

2

Do.
Sewing
Sixth and seventh

2

Do.
Cooking
Eighth

2 Do.
Orange, N.J......
Paper work,
Primary D, C, B, A,

2 45 minutes.
grammar E, D.
Clay work.
As above and a part of

f 1 Do.
high school.
Carpentry

High school grammar g 2, h 1 45 minutes to
A, B, C.

1 hour.
Sewing
Primary a, grammar

1 45 minutes. A, B, C, D, E, and

high school.
Cooking
High school

2 11 hours. Paterson, N. J ...... Drawing.

1 i 35 minutes. Woodworking Grammar

1 14 hours. Sewing do

1 Do. Vineland, N.J.......

All

3 45 minutes. Clay modeling. First to fourth.

1 1 hour.
Lessons in use of tools. Eighth to tenth..

1 Do.
Sewing
All

1 or 2 Do. Albany, N. Y ...

....do

5-3 15 to 30 min.

utes.
Carpentry ....
High school......

2 | 40 minutes. Jamestown City, N. Y . Prawing, primary kinder- | First to third years.

3 20 minutes. garten, and other work. Drawing, advanced kin: Fourth to sixth years... 3 | 25 minutos.

dergarten, sewing, and

other work.
The 11ge of tools, carpen-
Seventh to tenth years..

2 50 minutes.
try and joinery, mechan.
ical drawing.
Sewing, mending, etc., ...do

2 Do.
and cooking.
Printing
Seventh to twelfth years.

4 Do. a In term time. 6 In vacation. c Every two weeks. d Out of school (time!). For 4 months. f Alternating with paper work. g High school. h Grammar. i Average.

[ocr errors]

All...

Drawing,

Drawing

TABLE 3.--Showing grades in which manual training is given and time devoted to it in

city systems-Continued.

[blocks in formation]

Not less than

2 hours a week. Not less than

13 hours per week.

} (a)

(e)

[ocr errors]

Paper folding and cutting.. 9 lower grades.
Clay modeling..

13 lower grades.
Shop work......

5 upper grades....
Sewing

Fourth to elevonth.
Cooking

Second and third....
Newburgh, N.Y....
Drawing

All .....
Carpentry

Serenth to tenth years.
Sewing

Second to fourth years..
Olean, N. Y
Carpentry

Middle and upper
Tidioute, Pa
Mechanical drawing Grammar and high

school.
Carpentry

Grammar
Wood turning

High school
Iron forging

...do ...
Sewing

Intermediate graminar West Chester, Pa... Woodwork

Gran mar and high

school. Wilkes Barre, Pa...... Joinery

Seventh to tenth years..

1-3 | 40 minutes to

1 hour. 1 | 2 hours. 1 | 1 honr.

45 minutes. 2 1 hour.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[blocks in formation]

4 2 hours.

1

1

2 45 minutes.
6 1 hour.
2 81

Knoxville, Tenn. (Sla- Printing, sewing, cooking, Second. ter Training School). carpentry.

Printing, cooking, carpen- Third...

try.
Cooking, carpentry, print. Fourth

ing.
Appleton, Wis. (High Industrial drawing B and C......
School).
Shop work.....

B, C, and D.
La Crosse, Wis ..... Drawing, clay modeling, All

stick laying, paper cut-
ting and folding, paste-
board, leather, and wood

work.
Eau Claire, Wis..... Mechanical drawing Sixth grade to second

year high school. Carpentry ...

Sixth grade to high

school.
Iron forging...

High school
Wood carving (girls)

..do

[blocks in formation]

a Irregular.
6 8 upper grades.
c6 lower grados.
d Included in the time for drawing.
e Not less than 2 hours a week.

f Not less than 1 hour a week.
g Average.
K 2 lessons one week, 3 the next.
i During seventh and eighth years.
j During ninth and tenth years.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

CHAPTER XXX.

COMMERCIAL AND BUSINESS COLLEGES.

GENERAL REMARKS,

Returns have been received from 197 institutions during the past year, and the statistics of 36 institutions have been taken from the Bureau's Report of 1887–88, making a total of 233, an increase of 11 over the previous year. There has been an increase of 86 instructors and 7,183 pupils; 11 schools are reported for the first time.

The number of pupils in the business departments of colleges and secondary schools during the past year has fallen off to a considerable extent, and a corresponding increase in the enrollment of business colleges is shown in the statistical tables.

Twenty-nine per cent. of these institutions did not send any information to this Bureau for the current year. Complete statistics are necessary in order to represent the work done by the colleges. But as it frequently happens that colleges are established without being reported to the Burean, it is quite probable that there are institutions in the country which are not on the list. If the colleges that cio not appear will but send notice of their existance, a blank form will be forwarded.

It appears from a careful reading of the catalogues and returns sent by these institutions that the time required for a course of business training depends upon the natural aptitude of the student and the extent and completeness with which he wishes to qualify himself. From four to six months is the usual time necessary to complete the full business course; stenography, telegraphy, and typewriting require from three to four months each. In some of the colleges a collegiate course of four years has been added. In others special emphasis is laid upon mathematics, in which the student is rigidly examined before graduation.

During the past year the Bureau has received letters from several persons stating that, as the statistics of neighboring colleges had been falsified, they would not send those of their own institutions. This is a very embarrassing subject to discuss; the Bureau has no means of rectifying the statements it receives, and they are necessarily published as they are furnished.

The increase of the business colleges of the country has kept pace with the increase of population and with the growth of the business enterprises during the last ten years. Since 1880 the estimated increase in the number of colleges is 83 per cent.; of instructors, 173 per cent.; and of pupils, 115 per cent.

Improvements have also been made in the courses of study, and in the manner of preparing pupils for the responsible positions they seek to fill after leaving or graduating from the institutions. The most of the colleges give the student practica? knowledge of how business is transacted in the large cities in banking, in insurance, in real estate, and in commercial houses. If the student is far enough advanced in mathematics and in the English branches, very little attention is given to text books. In the college building are found the collego bank, with its president and board of directors, cashier, and tellers; the jobbing house and the commission house, and the insurance and the real-estate offices. The student before finishing his course is required to act as cashier, paying teller, receiving teller, shipping clerk, salesman, cashier, and bookkeeper. The student buys and sells, makes deposits, draws checks, and sustains the same general relation to the college bank and to the jobbing house that is held by a merchant in the great business world. He is also given instruction in the modus operandi of the insurance office, and is taught by the real-estate broker how to estimate the increased value of real estate by the increase of population and by the laws of supply and demand.

As the business of the country has enlarged and expanded, the knowledge of commercial law, of commercial calculations, and of the tariff laws of different nations has become a necessity, and business men are coming to demand a thorough practical education in all these branches before employing young men as their business assistants.

« PreviousContinue »