Journal of Proceedings and Addresses of the ... Annual Meeting Held at ...

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Contents

The Part of the ManualTraining High School in American Education Pritchett
71
School Gardens City School Yards and the Surroundings of Rural Schools Bright
77
School Gardens Clapp
85
School SurroundingsStetson
96
Justification of City Expenditure on Parks and Parkways etc Matthews
102
The NatureStudy Movement Bailey
109
The Beginning and Aims of the General Education Board Buttrick
116
The Educational Needs of the Southern NegroWalker
123
The Schools of the People Murphy
129
DEPARTMENT OF SUPERINTENDENCE
139
The Best Methods of Electing School Boards Jones
158
The Freedom of the TeacherGilbert
164
A Readjustment of the HighSchool Curriculum Coy
177
Industrial Training in Rural Schools Bayliss
185
Literature in the Grades and How to Use ItMrs Cooley
198
Form and Extent of Manual Training for PublicSchool Work
214
Round Table of City Superintendents
224
What Should Be the Features of a Modern ElementarySchool Building ?
235
Coeducation at the University of Chicago Small
288
Constitution
301
The Educational Progress of the Year 190219031yde
330
Memorial Addresses
365
Secretarys Minutes
377
Secretarys Minutes
407
The Childs Favorite Study in the Elementary Curriculum Barnes
420
Secretarys Minutes
429
Discussion Pellee Farrand Thomas et al
438
Coeducation in the High School Hall
446
The Teaching of Argumentative Discourse in High Schools Baker llartwrii 460
460
ROUND TABLE CONFERENCES
470
History Conference
484
Shall the University Concern Itself with the Morals and Manners of the Students
517
Discussion Baker Aber Swain et al
536
Does the Teachers Knowledge of a Subject Differ from the Scholars Knowledge
547
Conditions of Admission to Normal Schools Beckwith Halsey 566
566
DiscussionHendricks Salisbury
575
How Can the Normal School Increase its Scholarship etc Green
582
Secretarys Minutes
595
DEPARTMENT OF CHILD STUDY
753
Sex Differentiation in Relation to Secondary Education Yoder
785
The Percentage of Boys Who Leave the High School etc Ellis
792
How to Increase the Attendance of Boys at the High School Stableton
801
SelfDirection as a Motive for Increasing Attendance Scott
808
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
817
Place of Physical Education in the Curriculum etc Lyttle
823
Tests of Efficiency of a Normal School of Gymnastics Posse
829
Physical Training for the Mass of Students Anderson Whittier 837
837
DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE INSTRUCTION
847
The Proper Scope of Geological Teaching in the High School and Academy
853
The Teaching of Biology in High Schools Pearse 858 The Teaching of Biology in High Schools Pearse
862
College Chemistry and its Relation to Preparatory Work Remsen
872
The Laboratory the Place to Teach Fundamental Principles Smith
878
Aims and Methods Twiss
885
DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION
897
Their Functions etc Hunsicker
910
Consolidation of Rural Schools Fowler Prince 919
919
LIBRARY DEPARTMENT
937
PublicLibrary Work for Public Schools Miss Doren
943
The Mission of the Class LibraryLeland
953
The Library as an Adjunct to the Secondary School Holland
961
Library Instruction in the Normal School Brett Miss Ahern 971
971
Discussion Green Lyte Wilkinson Dewey 981
981
Influence of the Study of the Unusual Child upon the Teaching of the Usual
987
Should the Scope of the Public School Be Broadened ?Miss Greene
998
How Can the Term Charitable Be Justly Applied to Education ? Fay
1007
The Importance of Tests of Hearing Blake
1013
Facts and Fallacies in the Examination of School Childrens Eyes Standish
1020
Some Diseases of the Nose and Throat of Interest to Teachers Crockett
1028
Report of Committee on Statistics of Defective Sight and Hearing Booth
1036
Response Frissell
1043
The Present System of Indian Schools in Qualifying Indians for Citizenship
1049
Heart Culture in Indian Education Meserve
1056
Statistical Tables of Membership
1064
School IIygiene in its Bearing on ChildLife Wood
1070
753
1078

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Page 677 - In the elder days of Art, Builders -wrought with greatest care Each minute and unseen part ; For the gods see everywhere.
Page 414 - God; from his inmost heart awakens him to all nobleness, — to all knowledge, "self-knowledge" and much else, so soon as Work fitly begins. Knowledge? The knowledge that will hold good in working, cleave thou to that; for Nature herself accredits that, says Yea to that. Properly thou hast no other knowledge but what thou hast got by working: the rest is yet all a hypothesis of knowledge; a thing to be argued of in schools, a thing floating in the clouds, in endless logic-vortices, till we try it...
Page 577 - Blowing over the meadows brown. And one was safe and asleep in his bed, Who at the bridge would be first to fall, Who that day would be lying dead, Pierced by a British musket-ball.
Page 476 - The officers of the Association shall be a President, a Vice-President, a Secretary and a Treasurer, and the same person may occupy the offices of Secretary and Treasurer.
Page 531 - By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas, than to wring From the hard hands of peasants their' vile trash By any indirection.
Page 203 - How can an inanimate, mechanical gerundgrinder, the like of whom will, in a subsequent century, be manufactured at Niirnberg out of wood and leather, foster the growth of anything; much more of mind, which grows, not like a vegetable (by having its roots littered with etymological compost), but like a spirit, by mysterious contact of spirit; thought kindling itself at the fire of living thought?
Page 58 - There are fundamental truths that lie at the bottom, the basis upon which a great many others rest, and in which they have their consistency. These are teeming truths, rich in store, with which they furnish the mind, and, like the lights of heaven, are •not only beautiful and entertaining in themselves, but give light and evidence to other things, that without them could not be seen or known.
Page 32 - Illinois, moved that the Secretary be instructed to cast the ballot of the members present for the election of the nominees named to fill the vacancies occasioned by the several resignations which had been read.
Page 1 - To elevate the character and advance the interests of the profession of teaching, and to promote the cause of popular education in the United States.
Page 3 - ... two years, one for three years and one for four years beginning on November 1, 1935.

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