Works: Collected and Edited by James Spedding, Robert Leslie Ellis, and Douglas Denon Heath, Volume 2

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Page 645 - ... we have set it down as a law to ourselves, to examine things to the bottom ; and not to receive upon credit, or reject upon improbabilities, until there hath passed a due examination. This is, the sympathy of individuals ; for as there is a sympathy of species, so (it may be) there is a sympathy of individuals : that is, that in things, or the parts of things, that have been once contiguous or entire, 1 Compare Porta, Nat.
Page 419 - Generally the straight line hath the cleanest and roundest sound, and the crooked, the more hoarse and jarring. 222. OF a sinuous pipe that may have some four flexions, trial would be made. Likewise of a pipe made like a cross, open in the midst.
Page 578 - THE Turks have a pretty art of chambletting of paper, which is not with us in use. They take divers oiled colours, and put them severally, in drops, upon water, and stir the water lightly, and then wet their paper, being of some thickness, with it, and the paper will be waved and veined, like chamblet or marble.
Page 664 - The ointment that witches use, is reported to be made of the fat of children digged out of their graves; of the juices of smallage, wolf-bane, and cinque-foil, mingled with the meal of fine wheat. But I suppose, that the soporiferous medicines are likest to do it ; which are henbane, hemlock, mandrake, moonshade, tobacco, opium, saffron, poplarleaves, &c.
Page 652 - Cassar, poor and cowardly : and therefore he advised him, to absent himself as much as he could, and remove far from him. This soothsayer was thought to be suborned by Cleopatra, to make him live in Egypt, and other remote places from Rome.
Page 602 - ... naphtha of Babylon, a great distance off. It is therefore a subject of a very noble enquiry, to enquire of the more subtile perceptions; for it is another key to open nature, as well as the sense; and sometimes better. And besides, it is a principal means of natural divination; for that which in these perceptions appeareth early, in the great effects cometh long after.
Page 602 - IT is certain that all bodies whatsoever, though they have no sense, yet they have perception : for when one body is applied to another, there is a kind of election to embrace that which is agreeable, and to exclude or expel that which is ingrate...
Page 670 - ... warts went quite away : and that wart which I had so long endured, for company. But at the rest I did little marvel, because they came in a short time, and might go away in a short time again : but the going away of that which had stayed so long, doth yet stick with me. They say the like is done by rubbing of warts with a green elder stick, and then burying the stick to rot in muck.
Page 375 - The likeliest trial is by snow and ice ; for as snow and ice, especially being holpen and their cold activated by nitre or salt, •will turn water into ice, and that in a few hours ; so it may be, it will turn wood or stiff clay into stone, in longer time.
Page 577 - They have in Turkey a drink called coffee, made of a berry of the same name, as black as soot, and of a strong scent, but not aromatical ; which they take, beaten into powder, in water, as hot as they can drink it : and they take it, and sit at it in their coffeehouses, which are like our taverns. This drink comforteth the brain and heart, and helpeth digestion.

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