The Referendum in America: A Discussion of Law-making by Popular Vote

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Burk & McFetridge Company, 1893 - Referendum - 225 pages

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Page 146 - The Legislature shall not in any manner create any debt or debts, liability or liabilities which shall, singly or in the aggregate, with any previous debts or liabilities, exceed the sum of three hundred thousand dollars, except in case of war, to repel invasion or suppress insurrection...
Page 165 - ... found necessary — the General Court, which shall be in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, shall issue precepts to the Selectmen of the several towns, and to the Assessors of the unincorporated plantations, directing them to convene the qualified voters of their respective towns and plantations for the purpose of collecting their sentiments on the necessity or expediency of revising the Constitution, in order to amendments.
Page 100 - ... general or special election, whose duty it shall be, within ninety days after such election, to prepare and propose a charter for such city, which shall be signed, in duplicate, by the members of such board, or a majority of them, and returned, one copy...
Page 100 - Mayor, or chief executive officer, and authenticated by the seal of such city, setting forth the submission of such charter to the electors, and its ratification by them, shall, after the approval of such charter by the Legislature, be made, in duplicate, and deposited, one in the office of the Secretary of State, and...
Page 94 - In submitting any such charter, or amendment thereto, any alternative article or proposition may be presented for the choice of the voters, and may be voted on separately without prejudice to others.
Page 101 - Any city containing a population of more than three thousand five hundred inhabitants may frame a charter for its own government, consistent with and subject to the Constitution and laws of this State...
Page 27 - That it be recommended to the respective assemblies and conventions of the United Colonies, where no government sufficient to the exigencies of their affairs hath been hitherto established, to adopt such government as shall in the opinion of the representatives of the people best conduce to the happiness and safety of their constituents in particular, and America in general.
Page 156 - Indian descent not members of any tribe ; provided, that the legislature may at any time extend by law the right of suffrage to persons not herein enumerated ; but no such law shall be in force until the same shall have been submitted to a vote of the people at a general election and approved by a majority of all the votes cast at such election...
Page 214 - ... law shall have any force or effect until the same shall have been submitted to a vote of the electors of the state at some general election, and been approved by H majority of the votes cast on that subject at such election.
Page 107 - The legislative power of the state shall be vested in a General Assembly consisting of a Senate and House of Representatives, but the people reserve to themselves the power to propose to the General Assembly laws and amendments to the constitution, and to adopt or reject the same at the polls on a referendum vote as hereinafter provided.