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APPENDIX I

SUMMARY OF REPLIES OF STATE SUPERINTENDENTS TO QUESTIONS 1, 2, 3, 4, AND 6, RELATIVE TO

TEACHERS' SALARIES (Compiled from letters received direct from state superintendents since May 23, 1918)

QUESTION I
Percentage of Increase in Salaries
Necessary to Meet War

Conditions

QUESTION 2

QUESTION 3 Amount Expended for Teachers' Are the Laws Such that Local Communities

Can Levy Sufficient Funds for Salaries in 1917

Adequate Salaries ?

STATE

QUESTION 4
Are Adequate
Funds Available
for Additional
State Support?

QUESTION 6

Do You Favor
National Aid to the
Different States?

Elementary and Rural Teachers

High-School Teachers and Supervisors

Raised by Local Taxation

Appropriated by the State

In Rural Communities

In Towns and Smaller

Cities

In Large Cites

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25 to 50

b

334,254

1,905,1986

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No, too much red tape

State levies one

mill school tax
-constitu-

tional tax
Yes, all we give
No
No

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Yes
Yes, under certain

conditions
Yes
Yes

25 to 50

50

I 2,000,000 8,430,984

1,663,308 Local and state

4,000,000 14,808,670 9,000,000

135,000
3,812,375
2,527,739f
2,000,000

Total h
3,000,000

No
Yes
None

all

15 to 20

33

25 20 to 33t

33

25 20 to 33$

11,131,000 5,167,565

Not separated

722,728

Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes

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25

30
10 to 25 to highest
and 70 to lowest

18

k 4,500,000 4,300,000

Questionable No

Yes

25 10 to 25 to highest and 70 to lowest

121

Yes,

874,000 Not separated

260,000 18,000,000

3,927,984 Do not know

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Yes
Yes
Yes, decidedly
Yes
Yes, if there are not

too many strings

attached
Not under the condi-

tions ordinarily at:
tached to national
aid

Alabama. Delaware.

15 25

Florida.

Iowa.
Kansas.
Kentucky.

Maine.
Maryland.
Massachusetts
Minnesota..
Mississippi.
Missouri.
Montana

New Hampshire..
North Carolina..
North Dakota. ...
Oregon
Pennsylvania.

Rhode Island.

1,699,463

158,000

No

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a, Three mills county tax and 3 mills district tax by election in all communities (Alabama).
b, They can get along without increase (Florida).
c, From county school tax $1,905,198. Poll tax and one mill state tax included in the foregoing (Florida).

d, Can levy 3 mills for teachers, 5 for other purposes, in rural communities. Counties can now levy 7 mills, which will be raised to 10 mills by the November election of 1918
(Florida).

e, No, but 1918 legislature improved by fixing a local tax of 30 cents (Kentucky).
f, More than 50 per cent by state equalization fund (Maine).
8, Limited only by themselves in all counties (Maine).

h, Vocational-school teachers $302,228; Massachusetts school fund, $206,411; high school transportation and grants, $124,893; Union superintendents and teachers, $79,581
(Massachusetts).

i, Raised by local taxation, 60 per cent; appropriated by the state, 40 per cent (Mississippi).
j, Constitutional limitation (Missouri).
k, The state pays one-half of the salary of the district superintendents; also in small towns $2 per week for certified teachers (New Hampshire).

1. Yes, in the majority of cases, but in many cases where the size of the district is small or assessed valuation low, they are over their limit now and could not pay more (North
Dakota).

m, In cities of the first class not more than 6 mills nor less than 5 mills can be levied (Pennsylvania).

*, The law interposes no obstacles to assessment of sufficient revenue. There are practical restrictions upon the ability of rural towns to increase revenue by additional taxation
(Rhode Island).

o, Not over 50 cents on $100 can be levied in rural communities (Virginia).
p, Four million dollars state and county (Washington).

Amount raised by district not known. Amount raised by counties approximately same as state (Wisconsin).
r, Raised by local taxation, $652,263 for all purposes; state none; counties, general school fund, $510,091; total amount spent for teachers' salaries in 1917, $908,867 (Wyoming).
s. In most instances, yes (Wyoming).

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APPENDIX II

MEASURES ADOPTED TO MEET THE PRESENT

EMERGENCY The following extracts are the replies of state superintendents to question 5 of the questionnaires sent out by the Committee on Teachers' Salaries. It is the latest information on present conditions. Alabama.-Local tax levy. Delaware.—Last general assembly increast the school funds by taxing incomes. Florida.-Constitutional amendment raising tax from 7 to 10 mills will carry with little

opposition in the November election. Many counties have voted to raise teachers'

salaries an average of 10 per cent. Iowa.-Each district has its own budget to make up. We levy $40 per pupil and $60 in

districts transporting pupils. Kentucky.-By legislature fixing a 30-cent rate for county outside of city. By consolida

tion. By economizing so far as possible in expense of maintenance. Maine. The state of Maine offers this year an average increase in the salaries of super

intendents thus far elected of about four hundred dollars, and there is evidently an

increase in teachers' wages of at least 25 per cent. Maryland.—The recent session of the legislature increast the state appropriation $250,000

and increast the minimum salaries for teachers from 25 to 50 per cent. Massachusetts.-Legislation. In 1918 minimum of union superintendents raised from

$1500 to $1800; also $550 minimum for all teachers except in towns of less than

$1,000,000 valuation. Minnesota.-Increase of local taxation for school purposes. Mississippi.-We are making a campaign for more money by local taxation. Missouri. -An attempt has been made by a state tax commission appointed by the

governor, authorized by the state legislature, to raise the valuation of property.

The work of this commission was set aside by the state Board of Equalization. Montana.-Additional special levy. North Carolina.-Special local taxation for immediate relief. A movement to amend the

state constitution requiring a greater minimum length of term with proper legal

statuary enforcement. North Dakota.-Have given as much publicity as possible to the necessity for a material

increase in salaries. No legislature has met. Hence no bills for it. Oregon.—Principally larger district tax levy. Pennsylvania.–Our new minimum-salary law advances the salary from $40 and $50

respectively to $45, $55, and $65, and the amount needed to make this increase will be taken out of the general school appropriation, which was raised to $18,000,000 at

the last session of the legislature. Rhode Island.-School committees are asking town meetings and city councils for lower

appropriations. South Dakota.-By inducing school boards to levy sufficient tax. Texas.-By raising valuations of property. Utah.–Attempt being made to tax mines. Vermont.Our local boards are raising salaries in many cases 25 per cent. Virginia.- Increase standard appropriations and have levy to limit. Washington.-Conferences with all county officials and circular letters to all school

directors, superintendents, and principals. Wisconsin.-Local authorities are increasing tax levy for that purpose. Wyoming.–Maintain a teachers' employment bureau in the department of education,

which maintains standards. Convince district boards that other professions will take desirable teachers at higher wages.

APPENDIX III

ESTIMATED SALARIES AND EXPENDITURES NECESSARY TO

MEET THE ADVANCE IN COST OF LIVING IN 1918 The average salaries and expenditures for teachers' salaries are taken from Report of the United States Commissioner of Education for 1917, II, 50 and 54.

The estimated salaries to meet the advance in the cost of living are based on the table found on page 20 of the Report of the Railroad Wage Commission for 1918, Washington, D.C.

State

age of

58

506.09

Maine.
New Hampshire.
Vermont.
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut.
New York.
New Jersey:
Pennsylvania
Ohio.
Indiana.
Illinois.
Michigan.
Wisconsin.
Minnesota (1914).
Iowa.
Missouri
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska.
Kansas..
Delaware.
Maryland.
District of Columbia
Virginia..
West Virginia.
North Carolina.
South Carolina.
Georgia ..
Florida (1914)
Kentucky.
Tennessee.
Alabama.
Mississippi (1913).
Louisiana
Texas.
Arkansas.
Oklahoma
Montana.
Wyoming.
Colorado
New Mexico
Arizona.
Utah.
Nevada.
Idaho.
Washington.
Oregon...
California.

Estimated

Estimated ExAverage Salaries Salaries to Meet Percent- Total Expendi-penditures to Meet of Teachers, the Advance in

tures for Teachers' the Advance in 1914-15 Cost of Living, Increase Salaries, 1914-15 Cost of Living, 1918

1918 $ 411,13 $ 651.13

$ 2,240,982 $ 3,540,752 472.34

712.34

51
1,200,110

1,812,166
418.77
658.77

57
1,246,816

1,957,50r
810.72
1143.II

41

14,789,286 20,852,893
714.37
1007. 26

41
1,807,332

2,548,338
619.36
878.80

41

4,363,034 6,183,728 975.13 1365.18

40

46,690,195 65,366,273
861.86
I215.22

41
12,301,576

17,345,222
465.72
705.72

52

25,687,143 39,044,457 537.52 777.52

44

18,789,778 27,057,280 592.69 847.55

43

11,168,718 15,971,267 713.84 1006.51

41

23,179,650 32,683,306 557.71

797.53

43
11,931,113

17,061,492
542.02
782.02

44
8,850,051

12,744,073
469.28
709.28

51
10,375,297

15,666,698 746.09

47

11,174,716 16,426,833 533.59 773.59

43

10,767,962 15,398,186
574.76
821.91

43
3,695,051

5,283,923
457.27
697.27

52
2,987,437

4,540,904
454.67
694.67

53
6,217,797

9,513,229
635.34
895.83

41

7.933,519 11,186,262 358.31* 598.31

67
263,608

440,225
561.83
803.42

43
3,495,724

4,998,885
1019.08
1426.71

40
1,760,667

2,464,934
332.19
572,19

72
4,156,959

7,149,969
320.29
560.29

75
3.545,573

6,204,753
251.31
491.31

96
3,487,304

6,835,116
282.68
522.68

85
2,281,249

4,220,311
305.97
545.97

78

4.385,259 7,805,761 327.00 567.00

73

1,644,481 2,844,952
342.96
582.96

70
4,270,554

7,259,942
335.20
575.20

72

4,185,097 7,198,367
345.00
585.00

70
3,579,199

6,084,638 233.64

473.64

103
2,173,717

4,412,646
437.19
677:19

55
3,451,226

5,349,400
428.20
668.20

56
11,373,280

17,742,317
334.94
574.94

72
3,567,461

6,136,033
438.69
678.69

55

6,179,928 9,578,888
640.07
902.50

41
2,775,290

3,913,159 734.06

49
856,059

1,275,528
560.58
801.63

43
4,402,243

6,295,207
507.54
747.54

47
974,608

1,432,674
738.96
1041.93

41
943,525

1,330,370
691.66
975.24

41
2,572,114

3,626,681
725.08
1022.36

41
484,855

683,646 665.16

41
2,094,875

2,953,774
808.42
1139.87

41
7,854,843

I1,075,329
506.35
746.35

47

3,786,684 5,566,419 951.27 1340.05

40

17,062,504 24,035.949 $ 543-31 $ 788.43

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494.06

927.88

45.3 $345,006,445 $511,100,656

United States..

* Exclusive of Wilmington.

APPENDLX IV

PERCENTAGE OF ILLITERACY BY STATES States in which the number of illiterates increast from 1900 to 1910. Sixteen states increast in the number of illiterates, all in North and West.

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5.6

16.7 24.9

27.6 31.0

18.3

Massachusetts.
Rhode Island.
Connecticut.
New York.
New Jersey
Pennsylvania.
Illinois.
North Dakota.
Montana
Wyoming ..
Colorado.
New Mexico.
Arizona.
Utah
Washington.
California

134,043
29,004
42,973
318,100

86,658
299,376
157,958
12,719
11,675

2,878 17,779 46,971 27,307

6,141 12,740 58,959

141,541 33,854 53,665 406,020 113.502 354,290 168,294 13,070 14,457

3,874 23,780 48,697 32,953

6,821 18,416 74,902

7,498 4,850 10,692 87,920 26,844 54,914 10,336

351 2782

996 6,001 1,726

6.5 2.8 23.8

34.6

5,646

680 5,676 15,943

33.7

3.7 20.7 III 44.7 27.0

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