Annual Report of the Board of Education and the Superintendent of Public Instruction of New Jersey, with Accompanying Documents, for the School Year Ending August 31 ...

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John L. Murphy, State Printer, 1888 - Education
 

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Page 23 - Before these fields were shorn and tilled, Full to the brim our rivers flowed ; The melody of waters filled The fresh and boundless wood ; And torrents dashed and rivulets played, And fountains spouted in the shade.
Page 24 - Scicily, where the people had to emigrate to avoid starvation. But enough of the warning examples of history. It is not too late to repair all the damage that has been done in America by the devastation of our natural forests. A regulation of the use of the timber may be effected without any injury to the legitimate lumber trade, and the replanting as well as the establishment of artificial forests, may undoubtedly be made profitable for private as well as for public enterprise. If it is remunerative...
Page 25 - France which attain a height of over thirty feet, not more than sixty-five in Germany, but over one hundred and fifty in the upper part of the Mississippi Valley alone. All Europe possesses not a single native walnut tree. (The so-called English walnut is of Asiatic origin.) We have nine varieties of hickory and two of walnut proper. You may search all the world over in vain to find a sort of timber which, in general usefulness, can rival our hickory tree. Our walnut and oak varieties alone outnumber...
Page 32 - Nation; therefore the State or Nation, or both combined, should support free institutions of learning, sufficient to afford to every child growing up in the land the opportunity of a good common school education.
Page 24 - The object of the celebration is to instill into the minds of children and older citizens correct sentiments in regard to trees, and to store their minds with information relating to forestry, and to the distinguished individuals in whose honor or memory each tree, or group, is planted, for we would have all the trees around which the celebrations take place dedicated to great authors, statesmen, soldiers — in brief, to famous men and women, whose lives have reflected honor upon our country; to...
Page 26 - Let us look at Sicily, once the great grain reservoir for Rome. Since the island of plenty was despoiled of its forests, it gradually lost its fertility and the mildness of its climate. The ruins of proud and opulent Syracuse lay in a desert, covered by sand, which the hot sirocco, carried over the Mediterranean Sea from Africa. A few isolated, well-watered, and carefully cultivated districts of very limited extension, is all that is left to remind the tourist of the by-gone glory of Sicily.
Page 25 - ... the immense work of culture, which so far has been achieved in this country by the most intelligent, independent, progressive, and energetic of all nations, frustrated by the unavoidable consequences of our greedy mismanagement of the natural resources of our country ? Shall the future of this great republic be made uncertain by a gradual deterioration of soil and climate, or shall it forever remain the happy and comfortable home of the free? Is not the care for future generations one of the...
Page 24 - France, where the soil is much higher in price than here, why should it not be lucrative to cultivate them in those parts of the United States in which the timber is scarce and precious? They grow quicker here and to greater perfection than anywhere else. Nature has lavishly provided this country with an uncommonly large number of the most valuable species of trees. There are not more than thirty-five species and distinct varieties of native trees in France which attain a height of over thirty feet,...
Page 26 - I move in the sphere of experience with more certainty. I remember when the forests were hardly broken here that springs of water were very frequent and perennial. The rivulets and creeks and rivers had a perpetual flow ; these have now changed. The rivulets and creeks are now dried up in summer, and the fish so often caught by me in earlier years are now gone. Not one spring in a thousand remains.
Page 27 - Water-powers, which were formerly deemed to be inexhaustible, have entirely been abandoned, or their failing motive power has been replaced by steam. In the remembrance of the older settlers the climate of Wisconsin and Minnesota was remarkably steady, the Winters were long and cold, the supply of snow ample and regular, and late frosts in the Spring were unusual. Now the inhabitants complain of abrupt changes of the temperature in all seasons of the year, and of the irregularity of the snow-fall....

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