Autobiography Letters and Literary Remains of Mrs. Piozzi (T

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HardPress Publishing, 1861 - History - 506 pages
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Page 87 - Though secure of our hearts, yet confoundedly sick If they were not his own by finessing and trick: He cast off his friends, as a huntsman his pack, For he knew when he pleased he could whistle them back.
Page 94 - Would you eat your dinner that day, Sir?" JOHNSON. " Yes, Sir ; and eat it as if he were eating it with me. Why there's Baretti, who is to be tried for his life to-morrow, friends have risen up for him on every side ; yet if he should be hanged none of them will eat a slice of plum-pudding the less. Sir, that sympathetic feeling goes a very little way in depressing the mind.
Page 19 - ... us maun to our wark again, if our hearts were beating as hard as my hammer.
Page 111 - On some fond breast the parting soul relies, Some pious drops the closing eye requires; E'en from the tomb the voice of Nature cries, E'en in our ashes live their wonted fires. For thee, who, mindful of th...
Page 160 - ... ALMIGHTY GOD, who alone canst order the unruly wills and affections of sinful men ; Grant unto thy people, that they may love the thing which thou commandest, and desire that which thou dost promise ; that so, among the sundry and manifold changes of the world, our hearts may surely there be fixed, where true joys are to be found ; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
Page 79 - England and France affords a man. But when he wished to point them out to his companion: "Never heed such nonsense," would be the reply; "a blade of grass is always a blade of grass, whether in one country or another. Let us, if we DO talk, talk about something; men and women are my subjects of inquiry; let us see how these differ from those we have left behind.
Page 332 - ... and as it was not in his power to come to me, begging that I would come to him as soon as possible. I sent him a guinea, and promised to come to him directly.
Page 78 - Johnson strongly expressed his love of driving fast in a post-chaise *. " If," said he, " I had no duties, and no reference to futurity, I would spend my life in driving briskly in a post-chaise with a pretty woman ; but she should be one who could understand me, and would add something to the conversation.
Page 271 - A servant's strict regard for truth, (said he) must be weakened by such a practice. A philosopher may know that it is merely a form of denial ; but few servants are such nice distinguishers. If I accustom a servant to tell a lie for me, have I not reason to apprehend that he will tell many lies for himself.
Page 234 - ... together. If you have abandoned your children and your religion, God forgive your wickedness ; if you have forfeited your fame and your country, may your folly do no further mischief ! If the last act is yet to do, I who have loved you, esteemed you, reverenced you, and served you, I who long thought you the first of womankind, entreat that, before your fate is irrevocable, I may once more see you. I was, I once was, madam, most truly yours, ' SAM. JOHNSON. 'July 2, 1784. ' I will come down,...

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