Tales and Traditions of Hungary, Volume 1

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Page 90 - Thus discoursed the bright stranger. The young man awoke. On stepping out of his lodge he saw the star yet blazing in its accustomed place. At early dawn the chief's crier was sent round the camp to call every warrior to the council lodge.
Page 87 - There was once a time when this world was filled with happy people, when all nations were as one, and the crimson tide of war had not begun to roll. Plenty of game was in the forest and on the plains. None were in want, for a full supply was at hand. Sickness was unknown. The beasts of the field were tame, they came and went at the bidding of man. One unending spring gave no place for winter — for its cold blasts or its unhealthy chills.
Page 89 - They watched the stars; they loved to gaze at them, for they believed them to be the residences of the good, who had been taken home by the Great Spirit. One night they saw one star that shone brighter than all others. Its location was far away in the south, near a mountain peak. For many nights it was seen, till at length it was doubted by many that the star was as far distant in the southern skies as it seemed to be. This doubt led to an examination, which proved the star to be only a short distance...
Page 91 - They went and presented to it a pipe of peace, filled with sweet-scented herbs, and were rejoiced to find it took it from them. As they returned to the village, the star with expanded wing followed, and hovered over their homes till the dawn of day. " Again it came to the young man in a dream, and desired to know where it should live, and what form it should take. " Places were named. On the top of giant trees, or in flowers. At length it was told to choose a place itself, and it did so. "At first...
Page 92 - As they returned to the village, the star, with expanded wings, followed, and hovered over their homes till the dawn of day. Again it came to the young man in a dream, and desired to know where it should live and what form it should take. Places were named — on the top of giant trees, or in flowers. At length it was told to choose a place itself, and it did so. At first it dwelt in the white rose of the mountains; but there it was so buried that it could not be seen. It went to the prairie; but...

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