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Chamber of Commerce requests that if the present location is abandoned, a seaplane channel and basin be authorized at another locality.

5. The district engineer finds that in view of the expressed intention of major air-line operators to use landplanes for the North Atlantic service in their initial post-war operations, provision of a seaplane channel and basin at any location in Boston Harbor is not warranted at the present time. The proposed development of the Boston Airport provides for immediate construction of one 5,000-foot and three 7,000foot runways with ultimate extensions to 10,000 feet of these and other runways expected to be constructed later. These proposed extensions will necessitate the expansion of the airport area. Due to the presence of the Boston Harbor main ship channel and the Bird Island Anchorage on the south and southwest, the only directions remaining for such expansion to provide these lengths for the east-west and southeastnorthwest runways are to the north and east into the areas to be occupied by the authorized seaplane basin and channel. Since the development of the airport is conceded by all local interests to be of me primary importance, and since a seaplane channel and basin at any made

Har location in the harbor seems not warranted at the present time, the district engineer concludes that abandonment of the existing project for the seaplane channel is a necessity. The district and division engineers concur in recommending that legislation be enacted authorizing the abandonment of that part of the existing project for a seaplane channel for Boston Harbor, Mass., recommended in House Document No. 362, Seventy-sixth Congress, first session, and authorized by the River and Harbor Act of October 17, 1940; namely, the provision of a seaplane channel 12 feet_deep and 1,500 feet wide, extending northwesterly from President Roads, 17,500 feet to the easterly margin of Boston Airport (now officially designated the General Edward Low-e [] rence Logan Airport) and deposit of excavated material in such placesht as will permit enlargement of the airport.

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VIEWS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR

RIVERS AND HARBORS

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Notes

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Report

6. Information furnished the Board indicates that at least one aviation company contemplates using seaplanes as well as landplanes in the immediate post-war period and that prominent airplane manu-BN facturers state that seaplanes are more efficient than landplanes in sizes exceeding 90,000 to 100,000 pounds in weight. The ultimate need for a seaplane base at Boston Harbor is therefore to be expected

. However, the necessary provision for longer land runways will involve changing the location of the seaplane channel and basin now author-prosen ized.

7. The Board therefore recommends that the project for a seaplane M channel and basin authorized in the River and Harbor Act approred October 17, 1940, be abandoned and that in lieu thereof authority be as from granted for the construction of a seaplane channel at such alternate location as may be approved by the Chief of Engineers and at a cost

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stenot exceeding $2,300, the estimated cost of the project now authorized,

provided that construction of the channel shall not be undertaken be Nuntil the need therefor shall have been established to the satisfaction jords of the Secretary of War. For the Board:

JOHN J. KINGMAN,
Brigadier General, United States Army,

Senior Member.

REEXAMINATION OF BOSTON HARBOR, MASS.

SYLLABUS

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The district engineer is of the opinion that, in view of the definite trend toward the use of landplanes for transatlantic air service, provision by the Federal Government of a seaplane channel and basin at any location in Boston Harbor is not warranted at the present time. He therefore recommends that legislation be enacted authorizing the abandonment of that part of the existing project for Boston Harbor, Mass., recommended in House Doc. No. 362, Seventy-sixth Congress, first session, and authorized by the River and Harbor Act of 17 October 1940; namely, the provision of a seaplane channel 12 feet deep and 1,500 feet wide, extending northwesterly from President Roads 17,500 feet to the easterly margin of Boston Airport (now officially designated the General Edward Lawrence

Logan Airport) and deposit of excavated material in such places as will permit o enlargement of the airport.

WAR DEPARTMENT,
UNITED STATES ENGINEER OFFICE,

Boston, Mass., November 8, 1943.
Subject: Survey (Review of reports) on Boston Harbor, Mass.
To: The Chief of Engineers, United States Army.
(Through the division engineer, New England Division.)

1. Authority.--This report is submitted in compliance with the following resolution, adopted April 2, 1943, by the Committee on Rivers and Harbors of the House of Representatives, United States:

Resolved by the Committee on Rivers and Harbors of the House of Representatives, United States, That the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors created under section 3 of the River and Harbor Act, approved June 13, 1902, be, and is hereby, requested to review the reports on Boston Harbor, Mass., submitted in House Document No. 362, Seventy-sixth Congress, first session, with a view to determining if the recommendations therein submitted should be modified in any way

at this time. I

2. Report under review. The report under review was authorized by a resolution of the Committee on Rivers and Harbors of the House of

Representatives, adopted November 17, 1938. This report recommended further modification of the existing project for Boston

Harbor, Mass. for to provide a seaplane channel 12 feet deep and 1,500 feet wide, extending north

Westerly from President Roads 17,500 feet to the easterly margin of Boston Airport, and for deposit of excavated material in such places as will permit enlargement of the airport, all generally in accordance with the plan contained in the report of the district engineer, at an estimated first cost of $2,300,000 with annual maintenance of $60,000, in addition to that now required and previously Tecommended; subject to the provisions that local interests furnish, free of cost

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to the United States, as and when required, all lands, easements, and rights-ofway and spoil-disposal areas for the initial work and for subsequent maintenance; hold and save the United States free from claims for damages resulting from the ti improvement; and give assurances satisfactory to the Secretary of War that they will, at their expense, provide suitable bulkheads, dikes, or other structures for retention of excavated material.

3. The recommended modification of the project was adopted by Congress in the River and Harbor Act of October 17, 1940.

4. Description.-Boston Harbor is situated on the westerly side of an Massachusetts Bay. The harbor, which is well protected, includes all on the tidewater lying within a line from Point Allerton to Point Shirley, comprising an area of about 47 square miles, exclusive of the islands..me, From the entrance between these two points, which is about 5% miles wide, the approach to the harbor proper is through three improved main channels of entrance with mean low-water depths of 27, 30, and of 35-and-40 feet from the sea to President Roads. The main ship chan- kafo nel, extending from President Roads to the head of the harbor, provides ieet a depth of 35 feet for a width of 1,200 feet in the 6-mile reach from leet President Roads to the principal terminals at Boston; and a depth of sted 40 feet for a width of 600 feet in the 4% mile reach from President, sub Roads to East Boston. Branch and subsidiary channels and 30- and first 40-foot anchorages have also been provided in the harbor. The mean 90,0 range of tide in the inner harbor is 9.6 feet, the extreme range being than about 4 feet greater. There are no bridges over the portion of the 40. harbor with which this report is concerned. The improvement under consideration in this report would not result in any shore-line changes

, Liend nor would it involve any questions of land reclamation, water power, in au flood control, or other special subjects. The location of Boston lirali Harbor, its channels and anchorages is shown on United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Charts Nos. 246 and 248, and on the accompanyar ing map,

5. Tributary area. - Boston, with a population of 770,816 (1940), is vm t the largest city in New England and is the center of an important to manufacturing section. It is the wholesale and jobbing center for ads . practically all of New England, serving a population of nearly To 8,000,000. In time of peace it has direct service to all important isht South American and European ports and enjoys an extensive coast-vits wise trade. Under normal conditions, large quantities of foreign revitt

, ha materials are imported, which include wool, hides and leather, sisal

, cent hemp, coffee, and sugar. The port is also the center of the largest the ch deep-sea fishing industry in the United States. The metropolitana in co area, which includes 83 independent municipalities within 20 miles

, lied x has a population of approximately 2,351,000.

6. The area immediately tributary to the section of the harbor under licet consideration in this report is East Boston, a densely populated section at of Boston lying to the north and east of the inner section of the main Island ship channel. East Boston is separated from Boston proper Charlestown by the main ship channel, and from Chelsea by Chelsea Creek. East Boston is served by the Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany Railroads, for freight service only. Passenger service between 1 an East Boston and Boston proper is provided by a street railway system, the a part of which is rapid transit which passes through a tunnel benesta the harbor. Another underharbor tunnel accommodates vehicular traffic between Boston and East Boston. This traffic tunnel, for the

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use of which the city of Boston charges a toll of 20 cents per vehicle, provides the quickest and most direct route for automobiles and trucks

bound between Boston and East Boston. However, there are also Ta highways connecting East Boston with Chelsea, via the Meridian Street and Chelsea Street Bridges.

7. Prior reports.—Except for the report under review, referred to in paragraph 2 above, all previous reports on Boston Harbor pertain only to improvements for the benefit of waterborne commerce. Therefore, a description of these reports is not considered pertinent to the matter under consideration herein.

8. Existing project.—In addition to numerous improvements for the benefit of navigation, the existing project for Boston Harbor, Mass., provides for a seaplane channel 12 feet deep at mean low water and 1,500 feet wide, extending northwesterly from President Roads 17,500 feet to the easterly margin of Boston Airport, and deposit of excavated material in such places as will permit enlargement of the airport, subject to certain conditions of local cooperation. The estimated first cost of this portion of the existing project is $2,300,000, with $60,000 for its annual maintenance. The project for the seaplane channel was adopted by the River and Harbor Act of October 17, 1940. No work has been done on this portion of the existing project.

9. Local cooperation.-The River and Harbor Act of October 17, 1940, in authorizing the dredging of the seaplane channel, required that local interests furnish, free of cost to the United States, as and when required, all lands, easements, and rights-of-way and spoildisposal areas for the initial work and for subsequent maintenance; bold and save the United States free from claims for damages resulting from the improvement; and give assurances satisfactory to the Secretary of War that they will, at their expense, provide suitable

bulkheads, dikes, or other structures for retention of excavated maback

terial. To date these requirements have not been complied with,

although the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, prior to the initia1 . tion of its present plans for the development of the Commonwealth

Airport, had expressed its willingness to meet these requirements in the event Federal funds were made available for the provision of the seaplane channel. All prior requirements of local cooperation (which Il were in connection with navigation improvements) have been fully

complied with. . 10. Other improvements. There is a dredged channel approximately

2,000 feet long and 350 feet wide, in which depths ranging from 10 to bp 30 feet at mean low water were originally provided, leading from the - Bird Island Anchorage to the vicinity of the existing small seaplane

ramp and marine railway on the southerly side of the Commonwealth DD Airport. At the inner end of this channel, along its easterly side, there 130 is a basin, approximately triangular in shape, having an area of about 2014 acres and depths ranging from 8 to 12 feet at mean low water.

While these dredged areas provide an approach channel to the existing su seaplane facilities and a basin for small seaplanes, these areas were not

u dredged for this purpose. This dredging was done by the Commondate wealth of Massachusetts over 20 years ago in connection with a proposed pier development at this locality which was never carried out.

11. Terminal facilities (air).-Commercial air transportation in and out of Boston uses the General Edward Lawrence Logan Airport at

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East Boston, which is owned and operated by the Commonwealth of a Massachusetts. This airport is more commonly referred to as the Commonwealth Airport, and is so designated in this report. (At

cha the time the report under review was submitted, this airport was municipally owned and was known as the Boston Airport. This the airport, which is located on the northerly side of the main ship channel

, 2410 lies between East Boston, Winthrop, and Governors Island. The ads area occupied by the airport was formerly a shoal section of the harbor. cario Reclamation of the area was accomplished by hydraulic dredging in

be its vicinity. The present airfield is roughly rectangular in shape, about 4,000 feet long by 2,700 feet wide, and approximately 300 acres in area. It is partially enclosed by timber bulkheads.

The 12. The existing facilities include an Administration Building which serves both as the headquarters office building of the airport - then and also as the passenger terminal. There are 7 concrete runways radi 100 feet wide, ranging in length from 300 to 900 feet, located to pro- mame vide for flights in various directions. A concrete apron 300 feet wide in front of the Administration Building serves as a loading area. i tha There are a number of hangars, including those owned or leased by it American Airlines, Inc. (regular commercial service); Northeast din Airlines (regular commercial service, and training and operations sport unit); Inter-City Airlines; E. W. Wiggins Airways, Inc.; United na lan States Army Air Corps Service Detachment; Civil Aeronautics Alo Administration Air Carrier Inspection Department; Massachusetts - ag National Guard, etc. There is also a building for repair parts. Boundary lights, floodlights, and a radio control tower are operated. 4 10 h

13. On the south side of the field there is a seaplane ramp about 20 tal, it feet in width and a marine railway of approximately 3% tons' capacity

, and for maintained for the use of small seaplanes.

14. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts purchased the airport it as from the city of Boston about 2 years ago at a cost of $1,026,800, and since that time the Massachusetts Legislature has authorized a bonda issue of $4,750,000 to be used toward developing the Commonwealth ested to Airport into a completely modern terminal for commercial landplanes. et bie This development as presently proposed is shown on the accompanying to pr print of a plan 1 titled "Proposed Runway Layout, Commonwealth be aby Airport, Boston,” dated June 1943. The plan of development calls confe for the enlarging of the airport by the hydraulic placement of fill in te s an area of sufficient size to provide runways with lengths up to 7,000. feet, which it is expected will in the future be extended to 10,000 feet

. Fires Heavier material taken from Governors Island is to be placed on the tree, hydraulic fill over the runway areas. On September 28, 1943, the peel and Commonwealth of Massachusetts invited bids to be opened October alth 26, for the hydraulic filling of a considerable portion of the airport area. Only one bid was received, and this was greatly in excess of edup the amount appropriated for the work. The Commonwealth now plans to readvertise the work, dividing it into smaller sections in order to attract competitive bidding.

15. Improvement desired. - In order to obtain the views of the interested parties concerned, a conference was held at Boston, Mas., on August 27, 1943, at which the following interests were represented: Anists The Massachusetts Department of Public Works, by its commissioner

, director of waterways, and technical consultant from the Mass. chusetts Institute of Technology; the Massachusetts Aeronautics

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