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Minneapolis, in general accordance with the plans described and apaproved by the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors and the

Chief of Èngineers in their reports of February 8, 1938, and February 26, 1938, respectively, as subsequently modified by the reports printed in Senate Document No. 54, Seventy-seventh Congress, first session, to provide for a vertical bridge clearance of 26 feet above the estimated 40,000 cubic feet per second stage, the privately owned bridge and

utility structures to be modified by the Federal Government at an Wat estimated first cost to the United States of $8,259,000, with $55,000 ...annually for maintenance and operation of the navigation works; real subject to the conditions that local interests contribute $1,100,000 to Din the first cost of the improvement as a whole and provided that respon

sible local agencies furnish assurances satisfactory to the Secretary of ide War that they will: (a) make the necessary alterations to highway

bridges and publicly owned utilities, (b) furnish free of cost to the
United States all lands, easements, and rights-of-way necessary for
the channel and lock and dam construction, and (c) furnish at their
own expense suitable spoil-disposal areas for the new work and for
subsequent maintenance when and as required.
For the Board:

JOHN J. KINGMAN,
Brigadier General, United States Army,

Senior Member.
O

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A LETTER FROM THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, UNITED STATES ARMY, DATED JANUARY 10, 1944, SUBMITTING A REPORT, TOGETHER WITH ACCOMPANYING PAPERS ON A REVIEW OF REPORTS ON BOSTON HARBOR, MASS., REQUESTED BY A RESOLUTION OF THE COMMITTEE ON RIVERS AND HARBORS, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, ADOPTED ON APRIL 2, 1943

FEBRUARY 28, 1944.-Referred to the Committee on Rivers and Harbors and

ordered to be printed

War DEPARTMENT,

Washington, February 24, 1944. The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

Dear MR. SPEAKER: I am transmitting herewith a report dated January 10, 1944, from the Chief of Engineers, United States Army, together with accompanying papers, on a review of reports on Boston Harbor, Mass., requested by a resolution of the Committee on Rivers and Harbors, House of Representatives, adopted on April 2, 1943.

In view of the large amount of equipment, manpower, and critical materials which would be involved in the construction of the project, and since there is no presently indicated necessity for the project in the war effort, the Department is of the opinion that initiation of tonstruction of the project, if authorized by Congress, should be deferred until after the end of the war.

The Bureau of the Budget has been consulted and the Director advises as follows:

The report recommends abandonment of the project for the seaplane channel and basin in Boston Harbor authorized in the River and Harbor Act, approved October 17, 1940, and substitution therefor of an authorization for the construction of a seaplane channel at an undetermined location in Boston Harbor to be approved by the Chief of Engineers, at a cost not exceeding $2,300,000, provided that construction shall not be undertaken until the need therefor shall have been established to the satisfaction of the Secretary of War. REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR RIVERS AND

With respect to the recommendation for abandonment of the project authorized in the River and Harbor Act of October 17, 1940, there would be no objection to such a recommendation, since, as a matter of fact, the President was opposed to that authorization in the first place.

As to the recommendation for an authorization of a substitute project, the Ibe proposed report recommends unusual procedure in the following respects

: First

, that there be an authorization for a project with an indefinite location; and second, This that a determination of the time for beginning construction of the project would be 2.1 left with the Secretary of War, thus eliminating from that determination the effect of such fiscal considerations as the President, acting through this office, might otherwise wish to apply.

For these reasons, and in view of the fact that the President has not favored such 3 of a project, I do not think that an authorization of the improvement recommended in the proposed report should be considered in accord with the President's program. Respectfully,

ROBERT P. PATTERSON,

Acting Secretary of War.

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REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, UNITED STATES ARMY feet í

WAR DEPARTMENT,

aide OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS,

Washington, January 10, 1944.
The CHAIRMAN,
COMMITTEE ON RIVERS AND HARBORS,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: 1. The Committee on Rivers and Harbors of the House of Representatives, by resolution adopted April 2, 1943, requested the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors to review the reports on Boston Harbor, Mass., submitted in House Document No. 362, Seventy-sixth Congress, first session, with a view to determining if the recommendations therein submitted should be modified in any way at this time. I enclose the report of the Board in response thereto.

2. After full consideration of the reports secured from the district and division engineers, the Board recommends that the project for a seaplane channel and basin authorized in the River and Harbor Act approved October 17, 1940, be abandoned and that in lieu thereot authority be granted for the construction of a seaplane channel at such alternate location as may be approved by the Chief of Engineers and at a cost not exceeding $2,300,000, the estimated cost of the project now authorized, provided that construction of the channel shall not be undertaken until the need therefor shall have been established to the satisfaction of the Secretary of War. 3. Since the need for and any alternate location of the sesplane

of channel should receive the approval of the Civil Aeronautics Administration, such approval would be secured prior to initiation of work. After due consideration of these reports, I concur in the views and recommendations of the Board. Very truly yours,

E. REYBOLD,

Major General
Chief of Engineers

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HARBORS

War DEPARTMENT,
THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR RIVERS AND HARBORS,

Washington, December 13, 1943.
Subject: Boston Harbor, Mass.
To: The Chief of Engineers, United States Army.

1. This report is in response to the following resolution adopted April 2, 1943: Resolved by the Committee on Rivers and Harbors the House of Representatives, United States, That the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors created under section 3 of the River and Harbor Act, approved June 13, 1902, be, and is hereby, requested to review the reports on Boston Harbor, Mass., submitted in House Document No. 362, Seventy-sixth Congress, first session, with a view to deterizining if the recommendations therein submitted should be modified in any way at this time.

2. Boston Harbor is on the Atlantic Coast in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It has an improved main entrance channel about 2 miles long with a minimum width of 900 feet and a minimum depth of 40 feet from the sea to a deep-water area in the outer harbor known as President Roads and a main ship channel 6 miles long and 1,200

feet wide and 35 feet deep from President Roads to the principal je terminals in Boston; this channel has been deepened to 40 feet for a 1. width of 600 feet from President Roads to East Boston, a distance of

4 miles. Two additional channels of lesser dimensions have been provided from the sea to President Roads, and anchorages and branch and subsidiary channels have been provided in the harbor. The mean range of tide in the inner harbor is 9.6 feet. Total Federal cost of improvement of Boston Harbor to June 30, 1942, was $17,100,289 for new work and $1,443,179 for maintenance. The latest approved estimate for annual cost of maintenance is $174,000. In addition to numerous improvements for the benefit of navigation, the existing project provides for a seaplane channel 12 feet deep at mean low water and 1,500 feet wide, extending northwesterly from President Roads 17,500 feet to the easterly margin of Boston Airport, and deposit of excavated material in such places as will permit enlargement of the airport, at an estimated first cost to the United States of $2,300,000 and $60,000 annually for maintenance, subject to certain conditions

of local cooperation. No work on this part of the existing project 62 has been performed.

3. Boston is the metropolis of New England, with railways and highsteel Ways radiating therefrom, and a water-borne commerce extending to

all parts of the world. The Boston Airport occupies an area of about 300 acres of reclaimed land on the northerly side of the main ship channel between East Boston, Winthrop, and Governors Island. The city of Boston and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts have pro

vided bulkheads, paved runways, and the necessary buildings for zitate administration facilities and for servicing of planes.

4. The Massachusetts Department of Public Works, through its representatives, and other local interests request abandonment of the Seaplane channel authorized by Congress in the River and Harbor Act of October 17, 1940, for the reason that as long as it remains an authorized project it presents an obstacle to the enlargement of the Boston Airport as now planned. The Maritime Association of the Boston

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