The Beauties of the Bosphorus

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George Virtue, 1840 - Bosporus (Turkey) - 164 pages
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Page 37 - Tis a little thing To give a cup of water ; yet its draught Of cool refreshment, drain'd by fever'd lips, May give a shock of pleasure to the frame More exquisite than when Nectarean juice Renews the life of joy in happiest hours.
Page 97 - The village is only inhabited by the richest amongst the Christians, who meet every night at a fountain, •forty paces from my house, to sing and dance. The beauty and dress of the women exactly resemble the ideas of the ancient nymphs, as they are given us by the representations of the poets and painters.
Page 106 - The river nobly foams and flows, The charm of this enchanted ground, And all its thousand turns disclose Some fresher beauty varying round; The haughtiest breast its wish might bound Through life to dwell delighted here; Nor could on earth a spot be found To nature and to me so dear, Could thy dear eyes in following mine Still sweeten more these banks of Rhine! LVI. By Coblentz, on a rise of gentle ground, There is a small and simple pyramid, Crowning the summit of the verdant mound ; Beneath its...
Page 15 - ... fountains which it contains. For the first few moments, I was bewildered ; the heavy, dense, sulphureous vapour that filled the place, and almost suffocated me — the wild, shrill cries of the slaves pealing through the reverberating domes of the bathing-halls, enough to awaken the very marble with which they were lined — the subdued laughter, and whispered conversation of their mistresses murmuring along in an under-current of sound — the sight of nearly three hundred women only partially...
Page 129 - From the madhouse we proceeded to the slavemarket ; a square court, three of whose sides are built round with low stone rooms, or cells, beyond which projects a wooden peristyle. There is always a painful association connected with the idea of slavery, and an insurmountable disgust excited by the spectacle of money given in exchange for human beings ; but, beyond this, (and assuredly this is enough !) there is nothing either to distress or to disgust in the slavemarket of Constantinople. No wanton...
Page 16 - ... and lemonade — parties of playful children, apparently quite indifferent to the dense atmosphere which made me struggle for breath — and, to crown all, the sudden bursting forth of a chorus of voices into one of the wildest and shrillest of Turkish melodies, that was caught up and flung back by the echoes of the vast hall, making a din worthy of a saturnalia of demons — all combined to form a picture, like the illusory semblance of a phantasmagoria, almost leaving me in doubt whether that...
Page 133 - Armenian slab (for there is not a head-stone throughout the cemetery) peculiar and distinctive, is the singular custom that has obtained among this people of chisselling upon the tomb the emblem of the trade or profession of the deceased. Thus the priest is distinguished even beyond the grave by the mitre that surmounts his name — the diamond-merchant by a group of ornaments — the money-changer by a pair of scales — the florist by a knot of flowers — besides many more ignoble hieroglyphics,...
Page 58 - ... woods, arabesqued ceiling, and numerous casements, open no less than eight spacious saloons, appropriated to the Imperial Household. Above this suite are situated the State Apartments ; gorgeous with gilding, and richly furnished with every luxury peculiar alike to the East and to the West. The Turkish divans of brocade and embroidered velvet are relieved by sofas and lounges of European fashion — bijouterie from Geneva — porcelain from Sevres — marbles from Italy — gems from Pompeii...
Page 58 - ... bright-patterned carpet covering the floor, combine to fling over the vast saloon an atmosphere of light and gladness, which is increased by the dazzling glories of the parterre spread out beneath the windows ; with its flashing fountain, golden orangery, and long line of gleaming lattices. The Reception-Room is small, and remarkable only for the comfortably-cushioned divan on which the Sultan receives his visitors ; and the noble view that it commands of the channel, from the Seraglio Point...

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