The Graduated Course of Translation from English Into French: The Junior Course, with a Vocabulary of Idioms and Difficulties

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1899

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Page 32 - Here lies our Sovereign Lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.
Page 66 - Ariosto tells a pretty story of a fairy, who, by some mysterious law of her nature, was condemned to appear, at certain seasons, in the form of a foul and poisonous snake. Those who injured her during the period of her disguise, were forever excluded from participation in the blessings which she bestowed. But to those who, in spite of her loathsome aspect, pitied and protected her, she afterwards revealed herself in the beautiful and celestial form which...
Page 88 - The faith which, under the name of Islam,* he preached to his family and nation, is compounded of an eternal truth, and a necessary fiction, THAT THERE is ONLY ONE GOD, AND THAT MAHOMET IS THE APOSTLE OF GOD.
Page 81 - I cannot name this gentleman without remarking that his labours and writings have done much to open the eyes and hearts of mankind. He has visited all Europe, — not to survey the sumptuousness of palaces, or the stateliness of temples ; not to make accurate measurements of the remains of ancient grandeur, nor to form a scale of the...
Page 87 - Before he spoke, the orator engaged on his side the affections of a public or private audience. They applauded his commanding presence, his majestic aspect, his piercing eye, his gracious smile, his flowing beard, his countenance that painted every sensation of the soul, and his gestures that enforced each expression of the tongue. In the familiar offices of life he scrupulously adhered to the grave and ceremonious politeness of his country: his respectful attention to the rich and powerful was dignified...
Page 22 - There is scarcely a page of the history or lighter literature of the seventeenth century which does not contain some proof that our ancestors were less humane than their posterity. The discipline of workshops, of schools, of private families, though not more efficient than at present, was infinitely harsher. Masters, well born and bred, were in the habit of beating their servants. Pedagogues knew no way of imparting knowledge but by beating their pupils. Husbands, of decent station, were not ashamed...
Page 87 - Barbarian : his youth had never been instructed in the arts of reading and writing ; the common ignorance exempted him from shame or reproach, but he was reduced to a narrow circle of existence, and deprived of those faithful mirrors, which reflect to our mind the minds of sages and heroes.
Page 87 - According to the tradition of his companions, Mahomet was distinguished by the beauty of his person, an outward gift which is seldom despised, except by those to whom it has been refused. Before he spoke, the orator engaged on his side the affections of a public or private audience. They applauded his commanding presence, his majestic aspect, his piercing eye, his gracious smile, his flowing beard, his countenance that painted every sensation of the soul, and his gestures that enforced each expression...
Page 81 - ... to remember the forgotten, to attend to the neglected, to visit the forsaken, and to compare and collate the distresses of all men in all countries.
Page 38 - GLEIG.— LIVES OF THE MOST EMINENT BRITISH MILITARY COMMANDERS. By the Rev. GR Gleig, 3 vols. foolscap Svo. with Vignette Titles, 18s. cloth. GLENDINNING — PRACTICAL HINTS ON THE CULTURE OF THE PINEAPPLE. By R. Glendiuning, Gardener to the Right Hon. Lord Rolle, Bicton. 12mo. with Plan of Pinery, 5*.

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