Page images
PDF
EPUB

The author

THE

LATIN TUTOR,

OR

AN INTRODUCTION

TO THE

MA KING OF LATIN,

CONTAINING

A COPIOUS EXEMPLIFICATION OF THE RULES OF THE

LATIN SYNTAX FROM THE BEST AUTHORITIES.

ACCOMMODATED TO
ADAM'S GRAMMAR, AND SMITH'S N. H. L.

GRAMMAR.

ALSO,

RULES FOR ADAPTING THE ENGLISH TO THE LATIN IDIOM.

THE USE OF THE PARTICLES EXEMPLIFIED IN ENGLISH Sen-

TENCES DESIGNED TO BE TRANSLATED INTO LATIN.

• WITH

RULES FOR THE POSITION OF WORDS IN LATIN COMPOSITION,

Joseph

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

Edit 1854. Jee. /

The Gift of eller. Jorah bambbell e me the Police D.

[ocr errors]

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, TO WIT:

bruqu.

District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, that on the twenty fourth day of November A. D. 1813, and in the thirty eighth year of the Independence of the United States of America, EDWARD LITȚle & Co. of the said District, have deposited in this Office the title of a Book the right whereof they claim as Proprietors in the Words. following, to wit :

“ The LATIN TUTOR, or an Introduction to the Making of Latin, containing a copious exemplification of the rules of the Latin syntax from the best authorities. Accommodated to Adam's Grammar and Smith's N. H. L. Grammar. Also, rules for adapting the English to the Latin idiom. The use of the particles exemplified in English sentences designed to be translated into Latin. With rules for the position of words in Latin composition."

In Conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, intitled, " An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by secur. ing the Copies of Maps, Charts and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies, duringthe times therein mentioned ;" and also to an Act intitled, “ An Act supplementary to an Act, intitled, An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies during the times therein mentioned; and extending the Benefits thereof to the Arts of Designing, Engraving and Etching Historical and other Prints."

W. S, SHAW, Clerk of the District of Massachusetts.

.

PREFACE.

THE object of the following work is to furnish the Latin student with a series of exercises adapted to familiarize to his mind the inflections of words, and the application of the rules of syntax; and to lead him to such a knowledge of the structure of the language as may enable him to read and write it with ease and propriety.

The materials of which it is composed have been drawn from the purest sources, and will be found to possess intrinsick merit in sentiment, clothed in a rich variety of elegant and classical expression. The order and arrangement, it is hoped, will be found coru rect and perspicuous.

But the principal point on which the claims of this work are rested, is, that it endeavours to present, in. every part, a genuine Latin style, in place of that nondescript style, produced by conforming the Latin words to the English collocation, which occupies a considerable proportion of every work on this subject which has fallen within our knowledge.

This deformity in collocation is necessarily connected with another evil of no inconsiderable consequence. , * It rejects the enin, vero, autein, enimvero, and others of the most valuable Latin particles, on which depend, in no small degree, the beauty and grace of style; or in their stead substitutes the tire

* To ascertain the correctness of this idea, the instructor is requested carefully to examine the various works of this kind used in our schools and academies.

some monotony of nam, sed, and a few others which alone are permitted to occupy the first place in a Latin sentence.

This description of Latin, if it may properly be called Latin, although, by the almost uniform consent of respectable insiructors, it has been discountenanced in other elementary books, seems, by passing sub silentio, to have gained a prescriptive right in the book in which we might expect to find the greatest purity.

The absurdity of the attempt to form a good style by the aid of models so essentially defective, must be evident even to the most superficial observation.' It may, indeed, be said, with some degree of plausibility, that Latin of the character alluded to is easier and more intelligible to the pupil, and, of course, more convenient to the instructor; and that the use of it, if , confined to the early exercises, will not be liable to serious objections.

That the false Latin is more easy to be acquired than the true, will not be denied : it will also be admitted, that it may furnish the mind of the student with the knowledge of mere isolated words : yet it may justly be doubted whether the time and labour devoted to its acquirement be not wholly lost, or even worse than lost; especially, when it is considered, that Latin of this character, forming the first part of the book of exercises, is more thoroughly read, and more deeply impressed on the memory, and cannot but produce a vitiation of taste which the most diligent efforts will be scarcely able to correct.

It is true that the difference between the English, and Latin languages, in the order of words, is one of the principal difficulties with which the learner is call

[ocr errors]

ed to contend. It is a difficulty, however, which cannot be avoided : it must sooner or later be resolutely met, and conquered; nor will it be less formidable when there shall be added to it the force of vicious habit.

In this, as in most other cases, it will be found of essential importance to proceed correctly from the foundation. Were we possessed of competent authority in the republick of letters, we would utterly interdict the use of false and adulterated Latin, of whatever form or description. Our pupils should from the first be conversant with a pure, and genuine style, and with such only: nor should they be suffered to waste their ardour in the pursuit of what they must be inevitably compelled to reject and to unlearn. In

this way, although perhaps more laborious at first, • their minds would at every step realize some substan

tial fruits of their exertions; they would find a continual increase of vigour, and of relish for new acqui. sitions.

Guided by these views and opinions we have prepared this volume. It was intended, at its commencement, to be a new edition of Clarke's Introduction, improved by restoring the Latin to its true classick or. der. This circumstance will explain and apologize for the free use made of that volume in the early part of this.

On a'nearer examination of that work, and on recurring to the originals whence it was ta. ken, it was found, that, beside the defects in collocation, and in the use of the particles, many of its paragraphs were wholly irreclaimable, and a great proportion, even of its classical selections, consisted of mere shreds and fragments of sentences, often vicious

« PreviousContinue »