Dams and Control Works, Volume 2, Part 4

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1938 - Dams
A description of representative storage and diversion dams and high-pressure reservoir outlet works constructed by the Bureau of Reclamtion.

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Page 1 - That for the purpose of controlling the floods, improving navigation and regulating the flow of the Colorado River, providing for storage and for the delivery of the stored waters thereof...
Page 236 - The rock formations which make up the foundation and abutments at the site are homogeneous and uniformly elastic in all directions, and are strong enough to carry the applied loads with stresses well below the elastic limit. 2. The concrete in the dam is homogeneous and uniformly elastic in all directions and is strong enough to carry the applied loads with stresses well below the elastic limit.
Page 236 - ... site are homogeneous and uniformly elastic in all directions, and are strong enough to carry the applied loads with stresses well below the elastic limit. 2. The concrete in the dam is homogeneous and uniformly elastic in all directions and is strong enough to carry the applied loads with stresses well below the elastic limit. 3. The dam is thoroughly keyed into the foundation and abutment rock throughout its contact with the canyon profile; so that the...
Page 137 - ... in proportion to the capacity provided for each district in the canal except at Pilot Knob where the Imperial Irrigation District has all power rights. Power rights, on a part of the system used exclusively by one district, belong to that district. Construction features. — The Imperial diversion dam is of the slab-and-buttress type with a total length of 3,430 feet, inclusive of nonoverflow sections, headworks, gate structures, sluiceway, and overflow spillway. The overflow section is about...
Page 237 - ... fill. 5. The total vertical loads, including the weight of the water on the faces of the dam as well as the weight of the concrete, are assigned to the cantilever elements and are assumed to be transmitted to the foundations without any transfer of load laterally to adjacent cantilevers by means of vertical arching. 6. The effect of creep in concrete can be adequately allowed for by using somewhat smaller values of Young's modulus than would otherwise be adopted. These general assumptions...
Page 92 - With the gates raised, uplift pressures were assumed to vary from full reservoir pressure at the upstream face of the weir to zero or tailwater pressure at the downstream toe, and to be effective over two-thirds the horizontal area.
Page 9 - ... carried on in two stages : ( 1 ) circulation of air-cooled water through the pipe system and (2) circulation of refrigerated water through the same system. To supply the air-cooled water for the first stage of the cooling, an atmospheric tower was erected on the crest of the downstream cofferdam. The low humidity in the region and the natural draft in the canyon combined to make this method of cooling very effective. Water falling over the tower was collected in a basin at the foot of the structure,...
Page 242 - Analysis of Arch Dams by the Trial Load Method, by CH Howell, M.
Page 240 - ... dam to height. Such effects are not important in an arch dam built in a narrow canyon, as in Shoshone Dam, where the length of the top arch is less than the height of the structure. However, they are important in a relatively long arch dam like Gibson, where the top length is about four and one-half times the height of the structure. The general effect of considering twist action is a decrease in radial deflections at practically all locations, a decrease in maximum arch stress, a decrease in...
Page 48 - ... rehabilitation of the Roosevelt Power Canal and Diversion Dam, and miscellaneous betterments to the irrigation system to the extent the funds will allow. Repayment. — As previously stated, the Roosevelt Dam and the Granite Reef Diversion Dam and canal system were built by the Bureau of Reclamation in 1911 and turned over to the Salt River Valley Water Users

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