The Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, Volume 14

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Yorkshire Archaeological Society., 1898 - Yorkshire (England)
A review of history, antiquities and topography in the county.
 

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Page 135 - Society ; the degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him by the University of Glasgow in 1806; and in 1808 he was elected a member of the French Institute.
Page 35 - Index to archaeologists is now" recognised. Every effort is made to keep its contents up to date and continuous, but it is obvious that the difficulties are great unless the assistance of the societies is obtained. If for any reason the papers of a society are not indexed in the year to which they properly belong the plan is to include them in the following year ; and whenever the papers of societies are brought into the Index for the first time they are then indexed from the year 1891. By this...
Page 9 - Registries and a reference to these will often fill up a void, clear up a difficulty or supply an omission. It occasionally happens that the original Registers are preserved as well as later Transcripts ; in such cases, the two should be collated and all variations noted. PUBLICATION. With regard to the publication of Registers, the Committee have carefully considered the question of printing in abbreviated or index form and have come to the conclusion to strongly recommend that the publication should...
Page 550 - Types of fibulae and other ornaments. Coins. Implements and weapons, stone, bronze, or iron. Other antiquities. A list of place-names within the area. No modern names required. Special note should be made of British, Roman, and Saxon interments occurring in the same field, and other signs of successive occupation. Reference should be made to the article ' Archaeology ' in ' Notes and Queries on Anthropology,
Page 544 - In regulating the height of the head it is tedious and clumsy to arrange the proper blocks on the seat by trial. The simpler plan is to make the sitter first take his place on a separate seat with its back to the wall, having previously marked on the wall, at heights corresponding to those of the various heights of head, the numbers of the blocks that should be used in each case. The appropriate number for the sitter is noted, and the proper blocks are placed on the chair with the assurance that...
Page 110 - Church-wardens six months after her decease, and the interest arising therefrom to be laid out in Bread and distributed by the Minister and Churchwardens to the most indigent poor belonging to the parish of Pocklington every New Year's Day for ever.
Page 547 - ... any ceremonies performed at the hearth ; are the ashes used for divination ; is the fire ever kept burning for any continuous period ? (456) Is it unlucky to give fire from the hearth to strangers always, or when ? (467) Is there any ceremony on leaving a house, or on first occupying a house ? (509) What are the chief festivals, and what the lesser festivals observed ? (515) Explain the popular belief in the object of each festival. (516) Describe the customs and observances appertaining to each...
Page 540 - Traveller's Anthropometer,' manufactured by Aston & Mander, 25 Old Compton Street, London, WC ; price 31. 3s. complete ; without 2-metre steel measuring tape and box footpiece, 21. 10s. With this instrument all the measurements can be taken. In a permanent laboratory it will be found convenient to have a fixed graduated standard for measuring the height, or a scale affixed to a wall. For field work a tape measure may be temporarily suspended to a rigid vertical support, with the zero just touching...
Page 6 - Transcripts in the British Museum Library. ,, No. 4. — Registers of other Churches in all classes. ,, No. 5. — Parish Registers transcribed in MS. No. 1 —A List of Parish Registers that have been printed as separate works. Extracted by permission...
Page 552 - But tradition in the wide sense of the whole body of the lore of the uneducated, their customs as well as their beliefs, their doings as well as their sayings, has proved, when scientifically studied, of the greatest value for the explanation of much that we must fail to understand in the material remains of antiquity. To take a very simple instance : when we find in Gloucestershire barrows, cups, or bowls of rough pottery buried with the dead, we call them food-vessels, because we know that it is...

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