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we have a shoemaker's shop in Shoemaker's Street mass of the hill.” Geologists are satisfied that owned or occupied by six shoemakers from 1670 these two boats must have been in situ before the to 1792. The property was held of the Mayor formation of the strata heaped upon them; and if and Burgesses of Hedon.

so, that carries us back to preglacial and anteCordwain, for Cordovan, occurs, e.g., in Edmund diluvian times, and before the destruction of the Spenser's 'State of Ireland' (ed. Dubl., 1763, world by fire and flood, after which followed the p. 108), “his riding Shoes of costly Cordwain.” drift which covers so much of the surface of the

W. C. B. present babitable globe. That man existed in a

highly civilized state before that great catastrophe Queries.

which changed the surface of the earth, recent

discoveries have sufficiently demonstrated; and if We must request correspondents desiring information the works of man, such as implements both for on family matters of only private interest, to affix their names and addresses to their queries, in order that the

war and domestic use, pottery, carvings, coins answers may be addressed to them direct.

(engraved by a process unknown to either ancient

or modern numismatists), and boats have been PROBABLE ANTIQUITY OF A Boat AND TIMBER found in other parts of the world below the drift ROAD BECENTLY FOUND AT BRIGG, IN

which followed the great cataclysm (thereby provCOUNTY OF LINCOLN.-I am not aware whether ing they existed before it), is it impossible that the attention of your readers has been called to the boat and road recently discovered in Lincolnthese relics of the past, and therefore will briefly shire may be coeval with them? I assert nothing. call attention to them, in the hope some one learned I invite inquiry, and await a reasonable solution in such matters may give a probable solution of the of the mystery, C. T. J. MOORE, F.S.A. mystery which attaches to them. The roadway

Frampton Hall, near Boston, was discovered about two years ago, and the boat EXTRA VERSES IN ST. MATTIEW's Gospel. about two months since. The road was made of oaken planks fastened words of which the following is a modern para

In the Anglo-Saxon version of St. Matthew, the side by side, running across the road transversely. phrase occur between vv. 28 and 29 of chap. xx.: Below the planks were small trees and branches

“ Ye desire to speed in a small thing, and to be derunning in the contrary direction, and the whole creased in a great thing. Verily, when ye are bidden fastened to the ground by stakes, which seem to to a feast, sit not down in the highest seat, lest a more have been morticed, rather than bored, into the honourable man come after thee, and the master of the wood. Above the road are the following strata : house bid thee arise and make room for the other, and three feet of dark grey alluvial clay, with remains thou be put to shame. If thou sittest at a feast in the of vegetation in it; then two feet of brown alluvial that bade 'thee say unto thee, Friend, sit higher; then

lowest seat, and another guest come after thee, and he clay, and then one foot of peat, in which are found shall more honour be given unto thee, than unto him the remains of a forest with trees of vast size, of that is made to sit lower.” oak, yew, &c., which must have been some cen- In what Latin version of St. Matthew are such turies in growing; and all record of this upper words to be found in this place ? forest is entirely lost. Above this is the present

WALTER W. SKEAT. soil. The boat was found only a few feet below the

BRERETON.—Can any reader aid the underpresent surface, but was covered with clay and signed in tracing the ancestry of Thomas Brereton, alluvium which came from somewhere.

in Dublin in 1724! He leased It is

Gent., who formed out of one piece of oak, is forty feet long Abbey Street, formerly occupied by Thomas

there to Edmond Maguire, Gent., a dwelling in and four feet four inches across, and altogether of a most curious and primitive build. To attribute Grace, Esq. Capt. Thomas Brereton, his son, a date to either road or boat is hazardous, and we and came to America as early as 1754. He used

commanded the armed ship Betty, of Liverpool, can only venture upon it by analogy. I will, therefore, remind your readers of two other boats a seal, still in possession of the family, bearing the or canoes found in a somewhat similar position,

following described arms of Brereton :- Argent, and bearing a striking resemblance to the Brigg bear's head muzzled.

two bars sable; crest, out of a ducal coronet a boat.

Do any of the family Jo 1726 a canoe, thirty-six feet long and four pedigrees make mention of the above described

Thomas Brereton of Dublin? and a half feet wide, and all of one piece of oak,

Thomas J. BRERETON. was found dear Edinburgh under thirteen or four

Yonkers, New York, U.S. teen feet strata of loam, clay, shells, moss, sand, and gravel.

'Faber FORTUNE.'-In what edition of Bacon's Ai Callao, in Peru, in the seventeenth century, works can I find the 'Faber Fortunæ,' which some miners in running an adit into a hill dis- Pepys read with such pleasure ? “My dear Faber covered “a ship which had on top of it the great Fortunæ of my Lord Bacon." It can bardly be the essay ‘Of Fortune,' though Bacon does there 'Biog. Dram.' he is called “ deputy master of the quote the saying " Faber quisque Fortunæ suæ. revels." The latter is a phrase that has dropped It evidently took Pepys some time to read it out of use with court revels, but I suppose it through. It was in Latin. Pepys set his brother means the same office, really. C. A. WARD. John to translate it, and was not satisfied with the result.

T. G.

BLANKETEER.-- What does this word mean in

the following references? Who were the Blanketeers PRAYERS FOR THE Royal Family.-Can any of 1817 ? of your readers furnish a complete list of the “ Brandreth's insurrection in 1817, the projected ex. members of the royal family mentioned by name pedition of the Blanketeers a little later, and the Bristol in various editions of the Prayer Book ? I find the riots, were all parts of a widely concerted scheme.

Southey, in · Life and Corresp.,' 1833, vi. 203. following have been named in the present reign :

“This epistle awaited her at Beamish's inn on return1. Adelaide, the Queen Dowager ; the Prince ing from her blanketeering adventure.”—“ The Husband Albert ; the Prince of Wales; and all the Royal Hunter,' 1830, iii. 230. Family.

“ The King having formerly declared that he would 2. The Prince Albert; Albert, Prince of Wales, of whom they therefore named that his Majestie blan

not treat with any of those five notorious members, one &c. (1853).

cetering att him, might refuse thereupon."— Trelawney 3. The Prince Consort; Albert, Prince of Wales, Papers,' 1644, Camd. Soc., 8. &c. (1861).

J. A. H. MURRAY. 4. Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, &c.

Oxford. 5. Albert Edward, Prince of Wales ; the Princess of Wales, &c.

Sir RICHARD FRY.-So far back as 2nd S. vii. 129 Was there any reason for twice altering the MR. E. Horton made some inquiries concerning description of the Prince of Wales ?

Sir Richard Fry. Would any one favour me with FREDERICK E. SAWYER, F.S.A.

Mr. Horton's address, either then or now ?-as I Brighton.

am making similar researches to his, and wish to

communicate with him or his successors. Oliver=Moon (found in Bulwer's 'Rookwood'

E. A. FRY. and 'Paul Clifford'). -Quære?

Yarty, King's Norton, near Birmingham.

R. S. CHARNOCK. Boulogne-sur-Mer.

WORDSWORTH's BIBLE.— Will you kindly allow

me to ask any of your readers who have complete Matthew BUCKINGER.-Can any one give me editions of Wordsworth’s Bible to dispose of to any information respecting him? I have a head communicate with me, stating the price they want of King George I., about 5 in. by 6 in., the wig, for the books ? Post-cards permitted. dress, &c., containing very fine writing, said to be

H. J. CONLIFFE. done by Buckinger, who had neither hands nor 28, Adelaide Crescent, Brighton. feet; but I cannot make out any name or date

Corinth's PEDAGOGUE.--In stanza xiv. of his attached to it.

J. H. DANVERS. Croydon,

Ode to Napoleon Buonaparte' Lord Byron bids

the fallen emperor go to his island, gaze on sea DEDICATIONS.—

and land, both now free, and write on the sand, “ The custom of dedicating books is ancient; and they

That Corinth's pedagogue hath now have been usually dedicated either to great persons, for

Transferr'd his by-word to thy brow, protection or reward; or to acquaintances, out of friend. Who is the Corinthian pedagogue, and what the ship and affection; or to children, out of mutual love, and for their instruction." – First book of Mason's

"by-word” meant?

J. * Travels,' republished in ‘A Collection of Voyages and

[Corinth's pedagogue is Dionysius the younger, who Travels,' 1745.

during his second banishment from Syracuse is said to How soon after the introduction of printing was stead of the name of Dionysius that of Napoleon must

have kept a school at Corinth. Byron means that in. custom” adopted ? WM. FREELOVE. henceforward be the stock - by-word " among moralists Bury St. Edmunds.

for a fallen tyrant.] “ STANDARD" TAVERN.-Whereabouts was this FORBES OF CULLODEN.-Duncan Forbes, Lord tavern in Leicester Fields ? It was kept at the President, bad seven sisters. Jean married Sir H. close of last century by Sir Benjamin Tibbs, origin- Idnes ; Margaret, George Munro of Newmore ; ally a shoeblack at the Golden Cross, Charing Grizelda, Ross of Kindence. Will any reader of Cross. He became a sheriff of the City of London 'N. & Q.' kindly give me the names of the others ? in 1793. O. A. WARD.

F. N. R. Haverstock Hill.

South Italy. Revels. — Thomas Odell is called by Oldys PSEUDONYMS : “CensoR DRAMATICUS,” “AN “ deputy inspector and licenser of plays." In OLD PLAYGOER."—Whois“Censor Dramaticus,” the

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we have a shoemaker's shop in Shoemaker's Street mass of the hill.” Geologists are satisfied that owned or occupied by six shoemakers from 1670 these two boats must have been in situ before the to 1792. The property was held of the Mayor formation of the strata heaped upon them; and if and Burgesses of Hedon.

so, that carries us back to preglacial and anteCordwain, for Cordovan, occurs, e.g., in Edmund diluvian times, and before the destruction of the Spenser's State of Ireland' (ed. Dubl., 1763, world by fire and flood, after which followed the p. 108), “his riding Shoes of costly Cordwain.” drift which covers so much of the surface of the

W. C. B. present habitable globe. That man existed in a

highly civilized state before that great catastrophe Queries.

which changed the surface of the earth, recent We must request correspondents desiring information the works of man, such as implements both for

discoveries have sufficiently demonstrated; and if on family matters of only private interest, to affix their names and addresses to their queries, in order that the war and domestic use, pottery, carvings, coins answers may be addressed to them direct,

(engraved by a process unknown to either ancient

or modern numismatists), and boats have been PROBABLE ANTIQUITY OF A BOAT AND TIMBER found in other parts of the world below the drift ROAD

AT BRIGG, IN

which followed the great cataclysm (thereby provCOUNTY OF LINCOLN. I am not aware whether ing they existed before it), is it impossible that the attention of your readers has been called to the boat and road recently discovered in Lincolnthese relics of the past, and therefore will briefly shire may be coeval with them? I assert nothing. call attention to them, in the hope some one learned I invite inquiry, and await a reasonable solution in such matters may give a probable solution of the of the mystery. C. T. J. MOORE, F.S.A. mystery wbich attaches to them. The roadway

Frampton Hall, near Boston, was discovered about two years ago, and the boat

Extra VERSES in St. Matthew's GOSPEL.— about two months since. The road was made of oaken planks fastened words of which the following is a modern para

In the Anglo-Saxon version of St. Matthew, the side by side, running across the road transversely. phrase occur between vv. 28 and 29 of chap. xx.: Below the planks were small trees and branches

Ye desire to speed in a small thing, and to be derunning in the contrary direction, and the whole creased in a great thing. Verily, when ye are bidden fastened to the ground by stakes, which seem to to a feast, sit not down in the highest seat, lest a more have been morticed, rather than bored, into the honourable man come after thee, and the master of the wood. Above the road are the following strata : house bid thee arise and make room for the other, and three feet of dark grey alluvial clay, with remains thou be put to shame. If thou sittest

at a feast in the of vegetation in it; then two feet of brown alluvial that bade thee say unto thee, Friend, sit higher; then

lowest seat, and another guest come after thee, and he clay, and then one foot of peat, in which are found shall more honour be given unto thee, than unto him the remains of a forest with trees of vast size, of that is made to sit lower.” oak, yew, &c., which must have been some cen- In what Latin version of St. Matthew are such turies in growing; and all record of this upper words to be found in this place ? forest is entirely lost. Above this is the present

WALTER W. SKEAT, soil. The boat was found only a few feet below the

BRERETON.-Can any reader aid the underpresent surface, but was covered with clay and signed in tracing the ancestry of Thomas Brereton, alluvium which came from somewhere. It is

Gent., who lived in Dublin in 1724! He leased formed out of one piece of oak, is forty feet long Abbey Street, formerly occupied by Thomas

there to Edmond Maguire, Gent., a dwelling in and four feet four inches across, and altogether of a most curious and primitive build. To attribute Grace, Esq. Capt. Thomas Brereton, his son, a date to either road or boat is bazardous, and we and came to America as early as 1754.

commanded the armed ship Betty, of Liverpool,

He used can only venture upon it by analogy. I will, therefore, remind your readers of two other boats a seal, still in possession of the family, bearing the or canoes found in a somewhat similar position, two bars sable; crest, out of a ducal coronet a

following described arms of Brereton :- Argent, and bearing a striking resemblance to the Brigg bear's head muzzled. Do boat.

any

of the family In 1726 a canoe, thirty-six feet long and four pedigrees make mention of the above described

Thomas Brereton of Dublin ? and a half feet wide, and all of one piece of oak,

THOMAS J. BRERETON. was found dear Edinburgh under thirteen or fourteen feet strata of loam, clay, shells, moss, sand,

Yonkers, New York, U.S. and gravel

"FABER FORTUNÆ.'-In what edition of Bacon's At Callao, in Peru, in the seventeenth century, works can I find the 'Faber Fortuna, which some miners in running an adit into a hill dis- Pepys read with such pleasure ? "My dear Faber covered " a ship which had on top of it the great Fortupe of my Lord Bacon.” It can hardly be

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the essay ‘Of Fortune,' though Bacon does there · Biog. Dram.' he is called “ deputy master of the quote the saying “Faber quisque Fortunæ suæ.” revels." The latter is a phrase that has dropped It evidently took Pepys some time to read it out of use with court revels, but I suppose it through. It was in Latin. Pepys set his brother means the same office, really. O. A. WARD. John to translate it, and was not satisfied with the result.

T. G.

BLANKETEER.—What does this word mean in

the following references? Who were the Blanketeers PRAYERS FOR THE ROYAL FAMILY.-Can any of 1817 ? of your readers furnish a complete list of the “ Brandreth's insurrection in 1817, the projected exmembers of the royal family mentioned by name pedition of the Blanketeers a little later, and the Bristol in various editions of the Prayer Book ? I find the riots, were all parts of a widely concerted scheme." following have been named in the present reign :

Southey, in . Life and Corresp.,' 1833, vi. 203.

“This epistle awaited her at Beamish's inn on return. 1. Adelaide, the Queen Dowager ; the Prince ing from her blanketeering adventure." — The Husband Albert ; the Prince of Wales ; and all the Royal Hunter, 1830, iii. 230. Family

“ The King having formerly declared that he would 2. The Prince Albert; Albert, Prince of Wales, not treat with any of those five notorious members

, one &c. (1853).

of whom they therefore named that his Majestie blar.

cetering att him, might refuse thereupon."— Trelawney 3. The Prince Consort; Albert, Prince of Wales, Papers,' 1644, Camd. Soc., 8. &c. (1861).

J. A. H. MURRAY. 4. Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, &c.

Oxford, 5. Albert Edward, Prince of Wales ; the Princess of Wales, &c.

Sir RICHARD FRY.-So far back as 2nd S. vii. 129 Was there any reason for twice altering the MR. E. Horton made some inquiries concerning description of the Prince of Wales ?

Sir Richard Fry. Would any one favour me with FREDERICK E. SAWYER, F.S.A.

MR. Horton's address, either then or now ?-as I Brighton.

am making similar researches to his, and wish to

communicate with him or his successors. OLIVER=Moon (found in Bulwer's 'Rookwood'

E. A. Fry. and 'Paul Clifford').-Quære?

Yarty, King's Norton, near Birmingham,
R. S. CHARNOCK.

Wordsworth's BIBLE.—Will you kindly allow Boulogne-sur-Mer.

me to ask any of your readers who have complete Matthew BUCKINGER.-Can any one give me editions of Wordsworth’s Bible to dispose of to any information respecting him? I have a head communicate with me, stating the price they want of King George I., about 5 in. by 6 in., the wig, for the books ? Post-cards permitted. dress, &c., containing very fine writing, said to be

H. J. CUNLIFFE. done by Buckinger, who had neither hands por

28, Adelaide Crescent, Brighton. feet; but I cannot make out any name or date

CORINTH'S PEDAGOGUE.-In stanza xiv. of his attached to it.

J. H. DANVERS.

'Ode to Napoleon Buonaparte' Lord Byron bids Croydon.

the fallen emperor go to his island, gaze on sea DEDICATIONS.

and land, both now free, and write on the sand, “The custom of dedicating books is ancient; and they

That Corinth's pedagogue hath now have been usually dedicated either to great persons, for

Transferr'd his by-word to thy brow, protection or reward; or to acquaintances, out of friend. Who is the Corinthian pedagogue, and what the ship and affection; or to children, out of mutual love, “by-word” meant ?

J. and for their instruction.” – First book of Mason's * Travels,' republished in ‘A Collection of Voyages and [Corinth's pedagogue is Dionysius the younger, who Travels,' 1745.

during his second banishment from Syracuse is said to How soon after the introduction of printing was stead of the name of Dionysius that of Napoleon must

have kept a school at Corinth. Byron means that in. the “custom” adopted ? WM. FREELOVE. henceforward be the stock by-word " among moralists Bury St. Edmunds.

for a fallen tyrant.] “ STANDARD" Tavern.-Whereabouts was this FORBES OF CULLODEN. —Duncan Forbes, Lord tavern in Leicester Fields? It was kept at the President, had seven sisters. Jean married Sir H. close of last century by Sir Benjamin Tibbs, origin- Innes ; Margaret, George Munro of Newmore ; ally a shoeblack at the Golden Cross, Charing Grizelda, Ross of Kindence. Will any reader of Cross. He became a sheriff of the City of London N. & Q.' kindly give me the names of the others ? in 1793. C. A. WARD.

F. N. R. Haverstock Hill,

South Italy. Revels. —- Thomas Odell is called by Oldys PSEUDONYMS : “CENSOR DRAMATICUS," "AN deputy inspector and licenser of plays." In OLDPLAYGOER."—Whois“Consor Dramaticus," the

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author of ' A Complete History of the Drama from the language. One turns to them in vain to find
the Earliest Periods to the Present Time,' 8vo., how blade is locally used. J. A. H. MURRAY.
London, T. Wilkins, 1793 ; and who is “An Old Oxford.
Playgoer,” the author of 'Desultory Thoughts on AUCTION MART. — Cunningham says it was
the National Drama Past and Present,' second edi-
tion, 8vo., London, Onwhyn, 1, Catherine Street, logy,' says that it was founded in 1813.

opened 1810. Tegg, in ' Dictionary of Chrono

Who is Strand, 1850, dedicated by permission to Macready?

right?

C. A. WARD. H. T.

Haverstock Hill. TITLE OF EGMONT.—On the list of vice-presidents DEFENDER OF THE FAITH.-When the Pope in of the Tenth Annual Dairy Show, London, October, 1541 bestowed this title upon James V. of Scot1885, is found the name of the Earl of Egmont, land did he deprive Henry VIII. of it; and, if so, Cowdray Park, Sussex. Is the bearer of the title from which monarch does Queen Victoria inherit a real descendant of the Dutch family now extinct that now unmeaning designation ? Also, what in Holland ? How did he obtain the title ? proofs are there, beyond the statements given by

E. LAURILLARD. Sanders, and by Burnet, vol. i. p. 41, that Henry Amsterdam.

committed the horrible crime of marrying Anne [It is not probable that the title of Egmont, concern- Boleyn while knowing that she was his own which DR. LAURILLARD inquires, has any connexion daughter ? See Tindal's 'Rapin,' i. p. 799. with that borne by the famous Count of Egmont. The

JAMES GRANT. family name of the English house is Perceval. As our correspondent lives abroad, we insert the query.]

“AS DEAF AS THE ADDER.”—This has become BLADE. – I thank the many correspondents Psalm lviii. 4; but it is at least open to question

& proverb. I presume it took its rise from who have sent me information as to the local whether the Psalmist meant to brand the whole use of bird and fowl. I should now like infor- race as insensible to the voice or pipe of the snakemation from all parts as to the use of blade= charmer, or only to take an exceptional adder—a leaf. The history of this is curious. In German failure-as the type of those who “ go astray as blatt is the general word for leaf, laub is the foliage soon as they are born, speaking lies," and rejectof trees and bushes collectively; in 0. Norse blad ing good counsel. Hood has the saying, was the leaf of any herbaceous plant, lauf that of

As deaf as the adder, that deafest of snakes ; a tree ; in 0. E. leaf is the general word for both and De Quincey says (if my memory does not leaf and foliage, blæd occurring only once in poetry, said of “the broad blades" of the baleful play me false) that Bentley was as deaf to the plant which sprang from the blood of Abel. In melody of Milton's verse as an adder to the music M.E. there is no trace of blade = leaf, while the of Mozart. Is it a fact that the adder is insensible

C. M. I. sense of oar-blade (already in O.E.), sword-blade, to music more than other snakes ? knife-blade is common. It looks as if our modern "blade” of grass and “corn” were a later re- BELLMAN FIRST INSTITUTED.-According to an transfer of the oar-blade or sword-blade back old newspaper cutting that I have it is said they to vegetation ; although in regard to corn were instituted first in London 1556, crying, cannot avoid suspecting an influence of the “Take care of your fire and candle, be charitable M.L. bladum, Fr. blet, bled, blé, corn, wheat; to the poor, and pray for the dead.” In Tegg's especially since blade is in various passages used 'Dict. of Chronology, 8.v. “Bellman, 1530 is to translate these words. But in some dialects, given as the date with the same words. What e.g., that of Southern Scotland, blade is now ordi- are they both quoting from ? C. A. WARD. narily applied to all broad flat leaves, especially the Haverstock Hill, outer leaves of cabbages, lettuce, turnips, &c., the leaves of rhubarb, tobacco, docks, and the like; in a letter dated Chichester, January 22, 1826,

O'KEEFE AT CHICHESTER. —Bishop Buckner, e.g., to put strawberries in a cabbage blade. It is writes : _“ O'Keefe resides in a very small house of importance to know whether this is old enough in the suburbs of the city, which he and his to be directly connected with the brad blæd of 0.E., or with the O.N. blað, Dan. blad, or if it is daughter have occupied for eleven years ; they are merely modern, like the "blade” of grass, Willfriends much respected and esteemed." I wish to find kindly send me a post-card, saying in what senses

out this, nearly the last retreat of the dramatist.

W. H. blade is used of plants in their various districts ? Information from the north of England is particu

AUTHORS OF QUOTATIONS WANTED. larly desired. It is a disappointing feature of

Who is the author of the following fragment, seem. many of the local glossaries of the Dialect Society smile of ocean"?

ingly & version of the Æschylean "many-twinkling that they give hardly any help on these loonl And ye who o'er the interminable ocean Usages of words, so important for the history of Wreath your crisped smiles, NOXAD,

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