Analyzing Grammar: An Introduction

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, May 5, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines
Analyzing Grammar is a clear introductory textbook on grammatical analysis, designed for students beginning to study the discipline. Covering both syntax (the structure of phrases and sentences) and morphology (the structure of words), it equips them with the tools and methods needed to analyze grammatical patterns in any language. Students are shown how to use standard notational devices such as phrase structure trees and word-formation rules, as well as prose descriptions. Emphasis is placed on comparing the different grammatical systems of the world's languages, and students are encouraged to practice the analyses through a diverse range of problem sets and exercises. Topics covered include word order, constituency, case, agreement, tense, gender, pronoun systems, inflection, derivation, argument structure and grammatical relations, and a useful glossary provides a clear explanation of each term. Accessibly written and comprehensive, Analyzing Grammar is set to become a key text for all courses in grammatical analysis.
 

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Excellent, loving his writing style.

Contents

III
1
IV
2
V
4
VI
5
VII
7
IX
12
X
14
XI
18
LXXI
185
LXXII
187
LXXIV
189
LXXV
190
LXXVI
196
LXXVIII
197
LXXIX
199
LXXX
203

XII
22
XIII
24
XIV
26
XVI
28
XVII
32
XVIII
33
XIX
38
XX
41
XXI
44
XXII
46
XXIII
47
XXV
51
XXVI
52
XXVII
53
XXVIII
55
XXIX
58
XXX
61
XXXI
62
XXXII
63
XXXIII
66
XXXV
67
XXXVI
72
XXXVII
79
XXXIX
81
XL
83
XLI
87
XLIII
89
XLIV
90
XLV
92
XLVI
97
XLVII
98
XLIX
102
LI
111
LII
118
LIII
119
LIV
128
LVI
135
LVII
143
LVIII
147
LX
152
LXI
158
LXII
161
LXIII
163
LXIV
165
LXV
168
LXVI
169
LXVII
173
LXVIII
174
LXIX
180
LXX
181
LXXXI
211
LXXXII
214
LXXXIV
215
LXXXV
218
LXXXVI
220
LXXXVII
224
LXXXVIII
227
LXXXIX
230
XC
240
XCI
241
XCIII
247
XCIV
248
XCV
250
XCVI
253
XCVII
259
XCVIII
265
XCIX
266
C
270
CI
271
CII
277
CIII
280
CIV
282
CV
283
CVI
284
CVII
288
CVIII
292
CIX
296
CX
297
CXI
299
CXII
301
CXIII
302
CXIV
304
CXV
305
CXVI
307
CXVII
309
CXVIII
312
CXIX
313
CXX
314
CXXI
316
CXXII
317
CXXIII
319
CXXIV
325
CXXV
329
CXXVII
330
CXXVIII
334
CXXIX
341
CXXX
352
CXXXI
360
CXXXII
362
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About the author (2005)

Paul R. Kroeger is Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Linguistics at the Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics, Dallas.

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