Working for Wildlife: The Beginning of Preservation in Canada

Front Cover
University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 1998 - Nature - 297 pages

Twenty years ago, Working for Wildlife was published to wide acclaim. It remains the definitive history of the beginnings of wildlife consciousness in Canada.

When Banff National Park was established by the federal government in the late 1880s, wildlife protection was not a top priority. By 1922, however, the government had hosted the first Dominion-Provincial Conference on Wild Life Protection, and wildlife preservation had become part of established government policy. Janet Foster shows how, in the early decades of this century, a small band of dedicated civil servants transformed their own goals of preserving endangered animals into active government policy.

Today, the names of these individuals are scarcely known to most Canadians. Yet it was their commitment and dedication that charted the course of today's ecological movement. This new edition of Foster's important book will be welcomed by students of environmental studies, geography, and Canadian history, as well as by members of naturalist clubs and conservation societies. Lorne Hammond's new material places the book in context and provides readers with a sense of what has happened in the field since.

 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Parks Resources and the Role of Wildlife
16
The Beginning of an Idea
55
Towards Better Administration
74
Taking the Initiative
95
Protecting an International Resource
120
New Responsibilities
155
The Sanctuary Idea Broadened
178
Wildlife Conservation Comes of Age
199
Epilogue
220
NOTES
237
NOTE ON SOURCES 1978 EDITION
261
AFTER WORD TO THE SECOND EDITION WITH AN UPDATE
273
INDEX
287
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

JANET FOSTER, writer, photographer, and naturalist, produces and films nature and wildlife programs with her husband, John, for TVOntario, NHK Japan, and the Discovery Channel. LORNE HAMMOND is a professor in the Department of History at the University of Victoria.

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