Wittgenstein's Mistress

Front Cover
Dalkey Archive Press, 1995 - Fiction - 248 pages

Wittgenstein's Mistress is a novel unlike anything David Markson or anyone else has ever written before. It is the story of a woman who is convinced and, astonishingly, will ultimately convince the reader as well that she is the only person left on earth.

Presumably she is mad. And yet so appealing is her character, and so witty and seductive her narrative voice, that we will follow her hypnotically as she unloads the intellectual baggage of a lifetime in a series of irreverent meditations on everything and everybody from Brahms to sex to Heidegger to Helen of Troy. And as she contemplates aspects of the troubled past which have brought her to her present state--obviously a metaphor for ultimate loneliness--so too will her drama become one of the few certifiably original fictions of our time.

"The novel I liked best this year," said the Washington Times upon the book's publication; "one dizzying, delightful, funny passage after another . . . Wittgenstein's Mistress gives proof positive that the experimental novel can produce high, pure works of imagination."

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - antao - LibraryThing

(Original Review, 1990) I think the point—or premise?—of “Wittgenstein's Mistress” is that the monologue of the only person on Earth—necessarily, in the physical sense of "only", a "monologue"—is ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - solla - LibraryThing

This novel is in the form of a sort of a journal written by a woman who is the last person, maybe the last creature, on earth, or, at least, she thinks that is so, and the reader never learns ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
7
Section 3
243
Section 4
Section 5
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

David Markson's novels include Springer's Progress, Reader's Block, and The Last Novel.

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