Walden Two

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Hackett Publishing, 1969 - Psychology - 320 pages
This fictional outline of a modern utopia has been a center of controversy ever since its publication in 1948. Set in the United States, it pictures a society in which human problems are solved by a scientific technology of human conduct.
 

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One of the most overrated pieces of literature by an academic despot, control freak and I will go even further to say psychopath, who had the nerve to plagiarize the titles from works of true geniuses like Henry David Thoreau's masterpiece on freedom and George Orwell's prophetic and insightful dystopia. This man was clearly jealous of greater men than he, and wanted to lambast the works of freedom and works of warnings against losing those freedoms to portray a scientific dictatorship by Behaviorism as optimal, while denying one of the greatest essence of human existence; free will.
He's one of the reasons we have our psychopathic and pragmatic compulsory school system producing nothing but dumbed down, apathetic and conformist children ever in the history of mankind.
The fact his piece of garbage has so many high ratings is evidence that human freewill, dignity and self autonomy are truly things of past generations. Our ancestors would roll in their graves if they could see us now when they saw this scientific elite that Skinner represented for what they were; despots and megalomaniacs hellbent on controlling human thought and human behavior.
This is the man who devised much of the psychology teachers are trained in before they graduate.
“If freedom is a requisite for human happiness, then all that’s necessary is to provide the illusion of freedom.”
― B.F. Skinner
“Going out of style isn't a natural process, but a manipulated change which destroys the beauty of last year's dress in order to make it worthless.”
― B.F. Skinner, Walden Two
“We can achieve a sort of control under which the controlled, though they are following a code much more scrupulously than was ever the case under the old system, nevertheless feel free. They are doing what they want to do, not what they are forced to do. That's the source of the tremendous power of positive reinforcement-- there's no restraint and no revolt. By careful cultural design, we control not the final behavior, but the inclination to behave-- the motives, desires, the wishes.”
― B.F. Skinner, Walden Two
"We must delegate control of the population as a whole to specialists——to police, priests, teachers, therapies, and so on, with their specialized reinforcers and their codified contingencies"
― B.F. Skinner
"It is a mistake to suppose that the whole issue is how to free man. The issue is to improve the way in which he is controlled"
― B.F. Skinner
 

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A genius idea for a functional utopia. Also, an easy and accessible read.

Selected pages

Contents

Chapter 2
8
Chapter 3
15
Chapter 4
23
Chapter 5
28
Chapter 6
34
Chapter 7
40
Chapter 8
45
Chapter 9
60
Chapter 20
146
Chapter 21
167
Chapter 22
172
Chapter 23
179
Chapter 24
191
Chapter 25
197
Chapter 26
203
Chapter 27
208

Chapter 10
68
Chapter 11
77
Chapter 12
86
Chapter 13
91
Chapter 14
95
Chapter 15
107
Chapter 16
119
Chapter 17
128
Chapter 18
138
Chapter 19
142
Chapter 28
227
Chapter 29
236
Chapter 30
261
Chapter 31
264
Chaper 32
267
Chapter 33
277
Chapter 34
283
Chapter 35
286
Chapter 36
298
Copyright

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About the author (1969)

Burrhus Frederic Skinner (1904–1990), regarded by many as the most important and influential psychologist since Freud, earned his doctorate in psychology at Harvard University in 1931. Following appointments at the University of Minnesota and Indiana University, he returned to Harvard in 1948. He remained there for the rest of his career, retiring in 1974 as Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology.

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