Understanding Digital Humanities

Front Cover
D. Berry
Springer, Feb 7, 2012 - Computers - 318 pages
Confronting the digital revolution in academia, this book examines the application of new computational techniques and visualisation technologies in the Arts & Humanities. Uniting differing perspectives, leading and emerging scholars discuss the theoretical and practical challenges that computation raises for these disciplines.
 

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Contents

Understanding the Digital Humanities
1
2 An Interpretation of Digital Humanities
21
Transforming Power and Digital Technologies
42
Five Challenges
67
Material Media Archaeology and Digital Humanities
85
6 Canonicalism and the Computational Turn
105
7 The Esthetics of Hidden Things
127
8 The Meaning and the Mining of Legal Texts
145
Digital Humanities in the Panopticon
172
Is There an Epistemology for Patterns?
191
12 Do Computers Dream of Cinema? Film Data for Computer Analysis and Visualisation
210
Mapping Controversy in Wikipedia
224
14 How to Compare One Million Images?
249
Towards an Encounter between Humanities and Computing
279
Lessons Learned from Developing TextMining Tools for Textual Analysis
295
Index
315

9 Have the Humanities Always Been Digital? For an Understanding of the Digital Humanities in the Context of Originary Technicity
161

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About the author (2012)

DAVID BERRY is Lecturer in Media and Communication at the University of Swansea. He is the author of Understanding Softward in the Digital Age: Code, Mediation and Computation (Palgrave, forthcoming)Copy, Rip, Burn: The Politics of Copyleft and Open Source (Pluto, 2008) and co-editor of Libre Culture (Pygmalion Books, Canada, 2008). He has also published in journals such as Theory, Culture and Society, Critical Discourse Studies and The Journal of Internet Research.