This Changes Everything: Capitalism Vs. The Climate

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Simon and Schuster, Sep 16, 2014 - Business & Economics - 566 pages
13 Reviews
The most important book yet from the author of the international bestseller The Shock Doctrine, a brilliant explanation of why the climate crisis challenges us to abandon the core “free market” ideology of our time, restructure the global economy, and remake our political systems.

In short, either we embrace radical change ourselves or radical changes will be visited upon our physical world. The status quo is no longer an option.

In This Changes Everything Naomi Klein argues that climate change isn’t just another issue to be neatly filed between taxes and health care. It’s an alarm that calls us to fix an economic system that is already failing us in many ways. Klein meticulously builds the case for how massively reducing our greenhouse emissions is our best chance to simultaneously reduce gaping inequalities, re-imagine our broken democracies, and rebuild our gutted local economies. She exposes the ideological desperation of the climate-change deniers, the messianic delusions of the would-be geoengineers, and the tragic defeatism of too many mainstream green initiatives. And she demonstrates precisely why the market has not—and cannot—fix the climate crisis but will instead make things worse, with ever more extreme and ecologically damaging extraction methods, accompanied by rampant disaster capitalism.

Klein argues that the changes to our relationship with nature and one another that are required to respond to the climate crisis humanely should not be viewed as grim penance, but rather as a kind of gift—a catalyst to transform broken economic and cultural priorities and to heal long-festering historical wounds. And she documents the inspiring movements that have already begun this process: communities that are not just refusing to be sites of further fossil fuel extraction but are building the next, regeneration-based economies right now.

Can we pull off these changes in time? Nothing is certain. Nothing except that climate change changes everything. And for a very brief time, the nature of that change is still up to us.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AJBraithwaite - LibraryThing

I loved this book. It pulls together so many things that have been bothering me over the past ten years: climate change, social inequality, the industrialized food system and the historical injustices ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bness2 - LibraryThing

This needs to be red by anyone seriously concerned about climate change. The first part of the book is a bit discouraging, but the solutions proposed and some of the environmental triumphs that have ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction One Way or Another Everything Changes
1
PART ONE bAdTimiNg
29
The Revolutionary Power of Climate Change
31
How Free Market Fundamentalism Helped Overheat the Planet
64
Overcoming the Ideological Blocks to the Next Economy
96
Slapping the Invisible Hand Building a Movement
120
Confronting the Climate DenierWithin
161
PART TWO mAgiCAl ThiNKiNg
189
sTArTiNg ANyWAy
291
Democracy Divestment and the Wins So Far
337
You and What Army? Indigenous Rights and the Power of Keeping Our Word
367
The Atmospheric Commons and
388
Moving from Extraction to Renewal
419
Just Enough Time for Impossible
449
Notes
467
Acknowledgments
527

The Disastrous Merger of Big Business and Big Green
191
The Green Billionaires Wont Save Us
230
The Solution to Pollution Is Pollution?
256

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About the author (2014)

Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist, and author of the New York Times and #1 international bestseller The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. Her first book, No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies, was also an international bestseller. Klein is a contributing editor for Harper’s and reporter for Rolling Stone and writes a syndicated column for The Nation and the Guardian. She lives in Toronto.

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