The Myth of Sisyphus, and Other Essays

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Vintage Books, 1983 - Philosophy - 212 pages
25 Reviews
One of the most influential works of this century, this is a crucial exposition of existentialist thought. Influenced by works such as Don Juan and the novels of Kafka, these essays begin with a meditation on suicide: the question of living or not living in an absurd universe devoid of order or meaning. With lyric eloquence, Camus posits a way out of despair, reaffirming the value of personal existence, and the possibility of life lived with dignity and authenticity.--From publisher description.

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User Review  - Michael.Xolotl - LibraryThing

Just a few points: Camus articulates well what many people think or feel, whether you accept or reject those thoughts, and he follows them to their logical end; he references existential philosophers ... Read full review

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User Review  - trilliams - LibraryThing

One must imagine Sisyphus happy, and me hammered. Really though, reading The Myth of Sisyphus is like freebasing pure Camus philosophy. It's his great novels without the narratives, and it's a great ... Read full review

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II
2
III
3
IV
66
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About the author (1983)

Born in 1913 in Algeria, Albert Camus was a French novelist, dramatist, and essayist. He was deeply affected by the plight of the French during the Nazi occupation of World War II, who were subject to the military's arbitrary whims. He explored the existential human condition in such works as L'Etranger (The Outsider, 1942) and Le Mythe de Sisyphe (The Myth of Sisyphus, 1942), which propagated the philosophical notion of the "absurd" that was being given dramatic expression by other Theatre of the Absurd dramatists of the 1950s and 1960s. Camus also wrote a number of plays, including Caligula (1944). Much of his work was translated into English. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957. Camus died in an automobile accident in 1960.

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