The Hurried Child: Growing Up Too Fast Too Soon

Front Cover
Perseus Pub., 2001 - Family & Relationships - 244 pages
5 Reviews
With the first two editions of this landmark work, Dr. David Elkind eloquently called our attention to the dangers of exposing our children to overwhelming pressures, pressures that can lead to a wide range of childhood and teenage crises. Internationally recognized as the voice of reason and compassion, Dr. Elkind showed that in blurring the boundaries of what is age appropriate, by expecting-or imposing-too much too soon, we force our kids to grow up far too fast.In the two decades since this groundbreaking book first appeared, we have compounded the problem, inadvertently stepping up the assault on childhood in the media, in schools, and at home. Taking a detailed, up-to-the-minute look at the world of today's children and teens in terms of the Internet, classroom culture, school violence, movies, television, and a growing societal incivility, Dr. Elkind shows a whole new generation of parents where hurrying occurs and why and what we can do about it.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
1
3 stars
0
2 stars
1
1 star
0

The hurried child: growing up too fast too soon

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

These two books offer excellent perspectives on children, parents, and culture. Psychologist Apter (The Confident Child) argues that we've been hanging on to an idea that's all wrong that when ... Read full review

Review: The Hurried Child: Growing Up Too Fast Too Soon

User Review  - Ivy's Mom - Goodreads

I read The Hurried Child in college and it has stuck with me these 20 odd years. I encourage my friends and family to let their kids be kids, to hold on to their innocence as long as possible. Once that is gone, it is gone forever. A great read for every citizen of the "village." Read full review

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)

David Elkind, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus at Tufts University and the author of a dozen books, including The Hurried Child and All Grown Up and No Place to Go. He lives outside of Boston and on Cape Cod.

Bibliographic information