The Vietnam Reader

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Psychology Press, 1991 - History - 318 pages
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The writings of Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida pose a serious challenge to the old established, but now seriously compromised forms of thought. In this compelling book, Roy Boyne explains the very significant advances for which they have been responsible, their general importance for the human sciences, and the forms of hope that they offer for an age often characterized by scepticism, cynicism and reaction. The focus of the book is the dispute between Foucault and Derrida on the nature of reason, madness and 'otherness'. The range of issues covered includes the birth of the prison, problems of textual interpretation, the nature of the self and contemporary movements such as socialism, feminism and anti-racialism. Roy Boyne argues that whilst the two thinkers chose very different paths, they were in fact rather surprisingly to converge upon the common ground of power and ethics. Despite the evident honesty, importance and adventurousness of the work of Foucault and Derrida, many also find it difficult and opaque. Roy Boyne has performed a major service for students of their writings in this compelling and accessible book.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
To Care Without Judging
15
To Vietnam and Back
26
The Vietnam Experience
33
Living in Moral Pain
40
The Psychology of Survival
54
Why Men Love
68
The Vietnam War and the Erosion
82
Chicanos and Vietnam
186
Life Liberty and the Right to Protest
205
What Did You Do in the Class War Daddy?
213
A Nurses View
222
The Role of the Press
230
A World Turned Upside Down
240
Symbolic Expressions Ritual Healing
247
Pilgrimage to the Wall
253

What Are the Lessons of Vietnam?
91
Vietnam Reconsidered
100
Vietnam in Perspective
116
Stanley Kamow
125
The Legitimacy of the
136
Why We Did What We Did
145
Statement before the Senate Foreign Affairs
152
The Emergence of Nihilism
168
Roger Worthington
259
In Tribute to Bill
265
The Memorial as Symbol and Agent of Healing
272
The Road to Hill 10
290
Marching Along Together at Last
301
My Enemy My Brother
307
On Remembering the Vietnam
313
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About the author (1991)

Capps is Professor of Religious Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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