The Swiss Reformation

Front Cover
Manchester University Press, 2002 - History - 368 pages
The Swiss Reformation was a seminal event of the 16th century and the source of a distinctive Protestant culture whose influence spread across Europe from Transylvania to Scotland. This book provides the first comprehensive study of the subject in any language. The author argues that the movement must be understood in terms of the historical evolution of the Swiss Confederation, its unique and fluid structures, the legacy of the mercenary trade, the distinctive character of Swiss theology, the powerful influence of Renaissance humanism, and, the roles played by the dominant figures, Huldrych Zwingli and Heinrich Bullinger.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CurrerBell - LibraryThing

An extraordinary history of an extraordinary event in European history, the Reformation in Switzerland as it occurred in the mid-16th century, with some consideration of the Swiss Reformation's ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Widsith - LibraryThing

For more than half a century from the 1520s to the 1570s, the rural backwater that was the Swiss Confederation found itself, rather unexpectedly, at the heart of the European Reformation. This was ... Read full review

Contents

the Swiss Confederation
6
Zwingli and Zurich
46
Swiss Confederation dioceses rivers and lakes
48
The Swiss Confederation after 1536 148
54
The spread of the Reformation
86
War and disaster 152934
119
Consolidation and turmoil 153466
146
The radical challenge
191
Churchbuilding
228
Church and society
261
the Swiss churches and Europe
283
The culture of the Swiss Reformation
317
Conclusion
343
Selected further reading
349
Index
359
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Bruce Gordon is Lecturer in Modern History at the University of St Andrews and Deputy Director of the St Andrews Reformation Studies Institute.

Bibliographic information