The Soldier and the State: The Theory and Politics of Civil-military Relations

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Harvard University Press, 1957 - History - 534 pages
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In a classic work, Samuel P. Huntington challenges most of the old assumptions and ideas on the role of the military in society. Stressing the value of the military outlook for American national policy, Huntington has performed the distinctive task of developing a general theory of civil-military relations and subjecting it to rigorous historical analysis.
 

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Contents

National Security and CivilMilitary
1
Officer ship as a Profession
7
The Rise of the Military Profession in Western Society
19
Conservative Realism of the Profes
59
CivilMilitary
80
CivilMilitary Relations in Practice
98
The Liberal Society versus
143
The Conservative Constitution
163
TECHNICISM
218
The Failure of the NeoHamiltonian Compromise 1890
270
THE ABORTIVE IDENTIFICATION WITH SOCIETY 19181925
282
The Constancy of Interwar CivilMilitary Relations
289
The Alchemy of Power
315
CivilMilitary Relations in the Postwar Decade
345
The Political Roles of the Joint Chiefs
374
The Separation of Powers and Cold War Defense
400

THE EMPIRE WITHIN
169
DUAL CONTROL OVER THE NATIONAL
177
THE POLITICALMILITARY
184
The Roots of the A merican Military Tradition before
193
Departmental Structure of CivilMilitary Relations
428
Toward a New Equilibrium
456
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About the author (1957)

Samuel P. Huntington was Clarence Dillon Professor of International Affairs, Harvard University, and the author of Political Order in Changing Societies.

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