The Psychology of Jealousy and Envy

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Peter Salovey
Guilford Press, Feb 15, 1991 - Psychology - 293 pages
1 Review
This volume includes chapters from nearly every major contributor to the psychological literature on jealousy and envy as well as from several creative new investigators. The authors provide coherent accounts of their theoretical perspectives and describe their particular contributions to research in a specific problem area. Each chapter stands as an important integrative work; together they represent the definitive statement on the scientific study of this subject.
 

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This is an important work because it challenges common beliefs about jealousy, which are believed both by the public and by professional therapists.

Contents

JEALOUS AND ENVIOUS
1
A Cognitive Theory of Jealousy
52
Envy and the Sense of Injustice
79
THE EXPERIENCE OF JEALOUSY
101
Developmental Correlates of Jealousy
132
Modes of Response to JealousyEvoking
178
FAMILY SYSTEMS AND CULTURE
209
Self Relationship Friends and Family
231
The Motive for the Arousal of Romantic
252
Self and Society
271
Index
287
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

Peter Salovey received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Yale University in 1986 where he is presently an associate professor contributing to both the social/personality and clinical psychology programs. His major research interest is the functions of human emotion, especially the manner in which emotions direct cognition, motivate social behavior, and color close relationships. Most recently, Salovey has been concerned with complex emotions such as envy and jealousy, and the influence of emotions on perceptions of health and illness. He is the co-author of PEER COUNSELING (with Vincent J. D'Andrea) and REASONING, INFERENCE, AND JUDGEMENT IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (with Dennis Turk). Salovey is also the editor of the Guilford Emotions and Social Behavior Series.

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