The Martians Have Landed!: A History of Media-Driven Panics and Hoaxes

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McFarland, Oct 19, 2011 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 254 pages
5 Reviews
History is replete with examples of media-created scares and panics. This book presents more than three dozen studies of media scares from the 17th century to the 21st century, including hoaxes perpetrated via newspapers, radio, television and cyberspace. From the 1835 batmen on the Moon hoax to more recent bird flu scares and Hurricane Katrina myths, this book explores hoaxes that highlight the impact of the media on our lives and its tendency to sensationalize. Most of the hoaxes covered occurred in the United States, though incidents from Europe, Asia, Africa, South America and Australia are featured as well. Several are global in scope, revealing the power global media wields.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - annesion - LibraryThing

I have to say that in many ways I wanted to like this book. I think that the authors covered a broad range of topics that included some very well-known to virtually unknown panics and hoaxes. In my ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - TheBoltChick - LibraryThing

The Martians Have Landed is something of a critique on the press and media. This could have been a wonderfully entertaining book, exposing hoaxes in a fun way. Unfortunately the writing is very uneven ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
1
It Came from the AirwavesRadio
11
It Came from the Small ScreenTelevision
35
It Came from InkNewspapers
77
It Came from CyberspaceThe Internet
111
It Came from a Friend of a FriendMediaSpread Urban Legends
129
It Came from Everywhere
155
Notes
213
Bibliography
229
Index
241
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Robert E. Bartholomew has taught sociology in Australia at The Flinders University of South Australia and James Cook University in Queensland. A former broadcast journalist and contributor to news organizations such as the Associated Press and United Press International, he currently teaches at Botany College in Auckland, New Zealand. Benjamin Radford is deputy editor of the science magazine The Skeptical Inquirer. The author of several books, he has also written numerous articles on a variety of topics including urban legends, the paranormal, critical thinking, films, and media literacy. He has appeared on CNN, the History Channel, and the National Geographic Channel.

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