The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Domestic Self-Sufficiency

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Penguin, Oct 2, 2012 - Cooking - 288 pages
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The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home is not about extreme, off-the-grid living. It’s for city and suburban dwellers with day jobs: people who love to cook, love fresh natural ingredients, and old techniques for preservation; people who like doing things themselves with a needle and thread, garden hoe, or manual saw.

Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger Henderson spread the spirit of antiquated self-sufficiency throughout the household. They offer projects that are decidedly unplugged and a little daring, including:

* Home building projects like rooftop food dehydrators and wood-burning ovens
* Homemaking essentials, from sewing and quilting to rug braiding and soap making
* The wonders of grain: making croissants by hand, sprouting grains, and baking bread
* Adventures with meat: pickled pig’s feet, homemade liverwurst, and celery-cured salami

Intended for industrious cooks and crafters who aren’t afraid to roll up their sleeves, The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home will teach you the history and how-to on projects for every facet of your home, all without the electric toys that take away from the experience of making things by hand.
 

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The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Domestic Self-Sufficiency

User Review  - Stephanie Klose - Book Verdict

Albala (history, Univ. of the Pacific) and Henderson (coauthor with Albala, The Lost Art of Real Cooking) here tackle household projects both comestible (brewing, preserving) and not (rug braiding ... Read full review

Contents

To the Gentle Reader
Dumplings
Paġ deQueijo Lefse
Jams and Mostarda
Clothing Design
Making Quilts
Equipment for Braiding and Lacing
Gardening
A Proper Dehydrator
Index
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home is not about extreme, off-the-grid living. It's for city and suburban dwellers with day jobs: people who love to cook, love fresh natural ingredients, and old techniques for preservation; people who like doing things themselves with a needle and thread, garden hoe, or manual saw. Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger Henderson spread the spirit of antiquated self-sufficiency throughout the household. They offer projects that are decidedly unplugged and a little daring, including: * Home building projects like rooftop food dehydrators and wood-burning ovens * Homemaking essentials, from sewing and quilting to rug braiding and soap making * The wonders of grain: making croissants by hand, sprouting grains, and baking bread * Adventures with meat: pickled pig's feet, homemade liverwurst, and celery-cured salami Intended for industrious cooks and crafters who aren't afraid to roll up their sleeves, The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home will teach you the history and how-to on projects for every facet of your home, all without the electric toys that take away from the experience of making things by hand.

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