The Ladies' Work-table Book: Containing Clear and Practical Instructions in Plain and Fancy Needlework, Embroidery, Knitting, Netting, and Crochet. With Numerous Engravings ...

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G.B. Zeiber, 1845 - Embroidery - 168 pages
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Contents

I
iii
II
17
III
28
IV
37
V
54
VII
59
VIII
63
IX
71
XIII
88
XIV
91
XV
97
XVI
111
XVII
125
XIX
135
XXI
142
XXII
148

X
79
XI
82
XXIII
153
XXIV
156

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Page 125 - some of them were so delicate that they would pass through a man's ring, and a single person could carry a sufficient number of them to surround a whole wood. Julius Lupus, who died while governor of Egypt, had some of these nets, each string of which consisted of 150 threads; a fact perfectly surprising to those who are not aware, that the...
Page 23 - Brassfield bed includes numerous rounded, black pebbles and grains, possibly phosphatic, varying in size from an eighth to a quarter of an inch; a few equal even as much as an inch in diameter.
Page 27 - The harvest of the plain ? So lively glows The fair delusion, that our passions rise . In the beholding, and the glories share Of visionary battle. This bright art Did zealous Europe learn of pagan hands. While she assay'd, with rage of holy war, To desolate their fields : but old the skill : Long were the Phrygians' picturing looms renown'd; Tyre also, wealthy seat of arts, excell'd, And elder Sidon, in th
Page iii - ... Ladies' Work-Table Book, Philadelphia, 1845, takes another approach. Industrious ladies using it as a guide received stern lectures on the moral necessity of needlework as well as practical instruction. Indeed, the advice given would have pleased Alcott and would delight the so-called Moral Majority. The page of history informs us, that the progress of any nation in morals, civilization and refinement is in proportion to the elevated or degraded position in which woman is placed in society; the...
Page 27 - To raise at once our reverence and delight, To elevate the mind and charm the sight, To pour religion through th' attentive eye, And waft the soul on wings of extacy ; For this the mimic art with nature vies, And bids the visionary form arise.
Page vi - ... to the fabrics submitted to its operations. No one can look upon THE NEEDLE, without emotion ; it is a constant companion throughout the pilgrimage of life. We find it the first instrument of use placed in the hand of budding childhood, and it is found to retain its usefulness and charm, even when trembling in the grasp of fast declining age.
Page 100 - Sometimes knitting is done in rows of plain and pearl stitches, or in a variety of neat and fanciful patterns. Scarcely any kind of work is susceptible of so much variety, or can be applied to so many ornamental fabrics or uses in domestic economy. The fair votary of this art must be careful neither to knit too tight or too loose. A medium, which will soon be acquired by care and practice, is the best, and shows the various kinds of work to the best advantage. The young lady should take care to preserve...
Page 95 - ... of thought and attention is bestowed upon them, to make her a proficient in this delightful employment. With one or two additional remarks, we will conclude this portion of our labors. The young votary of the needle must recollect that, if she allows her fondness for this accomplishment to draw off her attention from the more serious or useful business of life, she will act decidedly wrong and had far better never learn it at all. Another thing to be especially guarded against, is, not to devote...
Page 57 - Noth ing looks more slovenly than ragged or unhemmed cloths, which are for domestic use. Little girls of the humbler classes might be employed by the more affluent, in making up those articles and a suitable remuneration be given them. They would thus become more sensible of the value of time, and would contract habits of industry, which would be of essential service to them in the more advanced stages of their progress through life. A fair price paid for work done, either by a child or an adult,...
Page 157 - ... the respect of the wise and the good, by judicious economy, and a neat and respectable appearance. Those ladies who are in the habit of devoting a portion of their time to the superintendence of our female charity schools, will also find such knowledge extremely beneficial. To those who are disposed to follow the example of the holy Dorcas, in providing...

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