The Idea of Justice

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Harvard University Press, Sep 30, 2009 - Philosophy - 467 pages
6 Reviews
Social justice: an ideal, forever beyond our grasp; or one of many practical possibilities? More than a matter of intellectual discourse, the idea of justice plays a real role in how - and how well - people live. And in this book the distinguished scholar Amartya Sen offers a powerful critique of the theory of social justice that, in its grip on social and political thinking, has long left practical realities far behind.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - EmreSevinc - LibraryThing

Before I bought the book I thought that some parts of it could be a difficult read for someone who is not well versed in political theory, philosophy of justice and social choice theory ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - thenamesake - LibraryThing

But democracy must also be seen more generally in terms of the capacity to enrich reasoned engagement through enhancing informational availability and the feasibility of interactive discussions. Aaaah ... Read full review

Contents

An Approach to Justice
1
The Demands of Justice
29
Reason and Objectivity
31
Rawls and Beyond
52
Institutions and Persons
75
Voice and Social Choice
87
Impartiality and Objectivity
114
Closed and Open Impartiality
124
Lives Freedoms and Capabilities
225
Capabilities and Resources
253
Happiness Wellbeing and Capabilities
269
Equality and Liberty
291
Public Reasoning and Democracy
319
Democracy as Public Reason
321
The Practice of Democracy
338
Human Rights and Global Imperatives
355

Forms of Reasoning
153
Position Relevance and Illusion
155
Rationality and Other People
174
Plurality of Impartial Reasons
194
Realizations Consequences and Agency
208
The Materials of Justice
223
Justice and the World
388
Notes
417
Name Index
451
Subject Index
462
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Amartya Sen, winner of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Economics, is Lamont University Professor, Harvard University .

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