The End of Liberalism: The Second Republic of the United States

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W.W. Norton & Company, 2009 - Political Science - 331 pages
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The main argument which Lowi develops through this book is that the liberal state grew to its immense size and presence without self-examination and without recognizing that its pattern of growth had problematic consequences. Its engine of growth was delegation. The government expanded by responding to the demands of all major organized interests, by assuming responsibility for programs sought by those interests, and by assigning that responsibility to administrative agencies. Through the process of accommodation, the agencies became captives of the interest groups, a tendency Lowi describes as clientelism. This in turn led to the formulation of new policies which tightened the grip of interest groups on the machinery of government.

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About the author (2009)

Theodore Jay Lowi was born in Gadsden, Alabama on July 9, 1931. He received a bachelor's degree from Michigan State University and a master's degree and a doctorate in political science from Yale University. He taught at Cornell University from 1959 to 1965, returned in 1972 and remained the John L. Senior professor of American institutions until he was granted emeritus status in 2015. He was a political scientist who wrote numerous books including The End of Liberalism: The Second Republic of the United States, The Politics of Disorder, American Government: Incomplete Conquest, The Personal President, and Hyperpolitics: An Interactive Dictionary of Political Science written with Mauro Calise. He also edited The Pursuit of Justice by Robert F. Kennedy. He died on February 17, 2017 at the age of 85.

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