The Doors Of Perception

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Harper Collins, Jan 1, 2014 - Philosophy - 70 pages
25 Reviews

Long before Tom Wolf’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test or Hunter S. Thompson’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Aldous Huxley wrote about his mind-bending experiences taking mescaline in his essay The Doors of Perception. Written largely from the first-person perspective, The Doors of Perception blends Eastern mysticism with scientific experimentation in equal parts, and what results is one of the most influential meditations on the effects of hallucinatory drugs on the human psyche ever written in the Western canon.

Huxley’s Doors of Perception ushered in a whole new generation of counter-culture icons such as Jackson Pollock, John Cage, and Timothy Leary, and inspired Jim Morrison and the naming of his band, The Doors.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Nicholas_Floyd - LibraryThing

When I first read The Doors of Perception / Heaven and Hell, most of it was lost on me, and I assumed this was because at the time I lacked any experience with psychedelics. The second time I read the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

If you ever have or ever plan to do any kind of mind-altering substance, you might want to check this book (written back in 1954 !) out, along with Timothy Leary/Ram Das (Richard Alpert) and Ralph ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4

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About the author (2014)

Aldous Huxley (1894–1963) is the author of the classic novels Brave New World, Island, Eyeless in Gaza, and The Genius and the Goddess, as well as such critically acclaimed nonfiction works as The Perennial Philosophy and The Doors of Perception. Born in Surrey, England, and educated at Oxford, he died in Los Angeles, California.

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