The Commercialization of Intimate Life: Notes from Home and Work

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University of California Press, Apr 24, 2003 - Social Science - 313 pages
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"A fascinating read, representing the sociological imagination at its freest and finest. Hochschild has a mind nimble enough to dance -- but always to the beat of generous and compassionate heart."—Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed, On (Not) Getting By in America

"In this set of penetrating and engaging essays, Arlie Hochschild explores the persistent problems of intimacy, family, and care in an increasingly globalized consumer capitalism. Hochschild applies the trademark perception, originality, and human-ness that has made her one of the country's most distinguished and productive sociologists. With their impressive weave of sociological theory, ethnographic research, and analyses of popular culture, these essays are a tour de force."—Juliet Schor, author of The Overspent American

"In her new book Arlie Hochschild takes a major step beyond The Second Shift and The Time Bind by illuminating the achievements and pitfalls of what she rightly characterizes as the stalled revolution for gender equality. Hochschild shows that the idea of the traditional nuclear family, or 'family values,' is not the solution to all our social problems, but a monumental hoax. Only major changes in the institutional context of family and work can create the conditions for the warm family life that most Americans want."—Robert Bellah, Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley

"In these remarkable essays, Hochschild breaks the well-established academic rule that to be profound you also have to be obscure. She subtly traces the cultural and structural trends that have objectified and commodified intimacy, emotion, personal commitment, and family life. Her messages are rarely rosy, but never fatalistic, and in all cases carry us beyond conventional wisdom on these elusive topics. Her prose is simultaneously scholarly, insightful, graceful, and full of surprises. What a pleasure it is to welcome this latest work."—Neil J. Smelser, author of The Social Edges of Psychoanalysis

"Hochschild's work is innovative. It combines close ethnographic study and attention to the details of family and emotional life, with analyses of wider cultural and social trends. The broad scope of her understanding of social life makes her work unusually insightful."—Demie Kurz, author of For Richer, For Poorer: Mothers Confront Divorce
 

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Fascinating essays about the modern woman's trials and triumphs in juggling home and work life. Read full review

Contents

V
13
VI
30
VII
45
VIII
58
IX
73
X
75
XI
87
XII
104
XVII
161
XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
149
XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
303
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About the author (2003)

Arlie Russell Hochschild is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. She is author of The Time Bind: When Work Becomes Home and Home Becomes Work (1997), The Second Shift: Working Parents and the Revolution at Home (1989), and The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling (California, 1983), all cited as Notable Books of the Year by the New York Times. She is also author of The Unexpected Community (California, 1973), and she has received the American Sociological Association Award for Public Understanding of Sociology.

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