The Bush Dyslexicon: Observations on a National Disorder

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 370 pages
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The Bush Dyslexicon is a raucously funny ride—whether it's Bush envisioning "a foreign-handed foreign policy" or Miller skewering vociferous cultural conservatives like William Bennett and Lynne Cheney for their silence on Bush's particular "West Texas version of Ebonics." But there is also a strong undercurrent of outrage. Only because our elections have become so dependent on television and its emphatic emptiness, says Miller, could a man of such sublime and complacent ignorance assume the highest office in the land.
 

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The Bush dyslexicon: observations on a national disorder

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Miller (media studies, New York Univ.; Boxed In: The Culture of TV) suggests that Americans may be suffering from a corporate form of dyslexia: "Seeing that it's all gone wrong, yet always hearing ... Read full review

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Contents

Look Whos Talking
1
The Madness of King George
77
The Young Pretender
97
Bush on Bush
98
The Wit and Humor of George W Bush
120
Bush on Books
123
Let Me Make One Thing Perfectly Clear
132
The Sequel
136
Commander in Chief
203
Its the Economy Your Excellency
212
The Nations Health
220
The Color Line
226
The Unborn
236
Death Row
242
Im Real
246
The Making of the President 2000
254

Bring Us Together
143
That OldTime Religion
147
Freedom of Expression
155
Gods Green Earth
167
Bush and Leadership
178
Bush on Foreign Policy
195
Afterword
259
Year One
277
Notes
351
Recommended Reading
366
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About the author (2002)

Mark Crispin Miller is a professor of media studies at New York University.

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