The Art of Dreaming: Tools for Creative Dream Work

Front Cover
Conari Press, Jan 1, 2001 - Self-Help - 206 pages

Jill Mellick is ushering in a new era of dreamwork with her revolutionary approach to dream analysis through artistic expression.

Dream books that guide readers to work with their dreams invariably ask those readers to write their dreams down, or perhaps record them. The Art of Dreaming stands apart from all other dream books in that it invites readers to work with their dreams in whatever medium is most natural and beneficial to them. For some readers that might in fact be writing or talking, but for others it might be drawing or painting or working in clay or dancing or dramatizing or recreating movement or maskmaking or working in multimedia or creating poetry. This book is a beautiful integration of dreaming and creativity, one that takes readers to a place where they can work with both the essential and deep messages from their dreams.

The beautifully designed book makes use of illustrative icons to clearly indicate to readers the art medium for each activity, whether writing, drawing, painting, maskmaking, etc., giving readers the ability to go directly to the type of activity that most appeals to them.

 

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The Art of Dreaming: A Creativity Toolbox for Dreamwork

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Ever wondered what that bizarre dream is trying to tell you? Mellick, a clinical psychologist and registered expressive arts therapist, details a multitude of ways to decipher your dreams. A firm ... Read full review

Contents

by Marion Woodman
xiii
Entering Your Dream World
1
Receive Dreams as Messengers from Another Realm
4
Treat Your Dream World as a New Culture
6
Work Creatively with Contradictory Dream Theories
9
Find Your Dreams Organic Art Form
12
Tradition and Innovation
14
Experiment with a Range of Approaches
16
Use a Stone to Mark a Sacred Dream
103
Use Collage to Express Color Shape and Theme
105
Make Masks of Dream Figures
110
Use Clay to Express Feeling Movement and Figure
113
Expressive Dream Work with Nightmares
117
Look at Both Good and Bad Associations to Images
121
Find the Opposite Image for Your Nightmare
123
Contain a Nightmare in a Short Poem
125

Keep Faith with Your Dream Life
19
Merging Dream Work and the Expressive Arts
21
Exercise Your Birthright to Unique SelfExpression
24
Respect the Four Phases of Expressive Dream Work
25
Make Time
26
Let Co of Coals and Judgments
28
Free Your Body and Spirit for Dream Work
30
Create a FreeForm Visual Journal
32
Treat Your Completed Work with Respect
33
Expressive Dream Work in Five Minutes
35
Free the Form
39
Follow the Form
42
Work with Fragments
44
Become the Dream Image
46
Capture Essence and Hunches
48
Choose Three Words to Amplify
50
Notice Synchronicities
51
Translate Your Dream into an Energy Painting
52
Take Your Energy Painting into Your Body
55
Remember Your Image through Simple Sketches
57
Do Simplified Sketches of Dream Animals
58
Make a Dream Eternal
59
Get Specific
61
Use Contrast
63
View Life Events as Dreams
66
Expressive Dream Work n Ten to Fifteen Minutes
69
Turn Your Dream into a Fairy Tale
72
Turn Your Dream into Your Life Myth
74
Unearth the Natural Poetry in Your Dream
77
Make a Poem out of a Challenging Dream
81
Look at Whats Missing
83
Write Your Dream HaikuStyle
85
Draw Mandalas after Dreams
88
Sound a Dream Maxidata
89
Draw a Mandala for a Big Dream
90
Write a Short Dream as a Mandala
91
Move Like Your Dream Animal
95
Tell Your Dream from a New Viewpoint
97
Converse with Dream Entities
100
Create Contained Energy Paintings
128
Make a Healing Mandala
129
Offer Up Dark Dreams to Nature
130
Give Nightmares Tangible Form
132
The Care and Feeding of Dream Figures and Animals
137
Care for Figures We Know
142
Care for Figures We Dont Know
143
Care for Opposite Sex Figures
145
Care for Magical Mythical and Divine Figures
146
Tend Your Dream Animals
147
Expressive Dream Work with Recurring Dreams and Series
151
Visit an Art Gallery of Repeated Images
155
Amplify Associations
156
Visit the Rogues Gallery
157
Work with Repeated Actions
158
Explore Repeated Times of Day and Season
160
Explore Repeated Colors
161
Map Directions
162
Observe Repeated Feelings and Emotions
163
Use Different Media for Recurring Images
164
Map Structural Patterns
166
Look for Perspective
167
Enriching Dream Work in Groups
169
Share Dreams with Trusted Others
172
Set a Context for Dream Work with a Partner
173
Explore Dont Interpret Your Partners Dream
174
Celebrate Whats Unique and Whats Shared
177
Select Your Croup Members Carefully
178
Practice Acceptance and Nonjudgment
179
Establish a Framework
180
Use Every Medium from Mime to Song
182
Dont Compare Appreciate
183
To Go Further
185
Bibliography
187
Acknowledgments
193
A Special Acknowledgment to the Dreamers and Artists
195
Index
197
About the Author
205
Copyright

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Page vi - ... same natural appearances, recreated, recast, transposed of course, not cast aside and totally replaced by other appearances proper to another realm of Things in the world of visible Being. It's as good as having the soul of a flower in an elephant. In genuine metaphor the illuminating image arrives from another world, as a bird through the window of your room, to quicken the transposition of natural appearances and their power of significance: it supersedes them only for an instant, it does not...

About the author (2001)

Poet, artist, and writer Jill Mellick, Ph.D., is the coauthor of The Worlds of P'otsunu, and author of The Natural Artistry of Dreams. She travels and teaches internationally, focusing on the use of the arts for psychospiritual dimensions and has been in private practice for many years as a Jungianoriented clinical psychologist and registered expressive arts therapist. She lives in Palo Alto, California.


Marion Woodman, Ph.D. (Hon.) is the author of many widely respected books, including the bestselling Addiction to Perfection. She lives in Canada.

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