Telecommunications in Canada: Technology, Industry, and Government

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University of Toronto Press, 1990 - Business & Economics - 363 pages
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This study provides Canada's first comprehensive, integrated treatment of the emergence and development of key communication sectors: telegraph telephones, cable TV, broadcasting, communication satellites, and electronic publishing. By focusing on real institutions, actual (and frequently predatory) business practices, and law and regulatory policies, in both historical and contemporary perspectives, Babe helps demystify current communication issues.

Stressing the flexibility of communication 'technologies' on the one hand, and the element of corporate power on the other, Babe reintroduces the principle of corporate/governmental responsibility for communication outcomes, a principle that has been largely drowned out by the shrill cries of 'Information Revolution.'

 

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Contents

Mythologies of Canadian Telecommunications
3
Telecommunications Today
22
Onset of Electronic Communication
35
Cartelization
45
The Telegraph CoasttoCoast
54
Inception
65
Independent Telephones
74
The Politics of Government Control
91
Rate Regulation
158
Juggling Corporate Forms
175
Broadcasting
199
Cable Television
208
Communications Satellites
219
Electronic Publishing
229
Political Economy
239
An Information Revolution?
247

Western Reaction
102
LocalExchange Competition in Ontario and Quebec
114
LongDistance Competition and Reversed Rate Rebalancing
127
Arguments and Evidence
137
Predatory Pricing and the Cost Inquiry
150
NOTES
259
BIBLIOGRAPHY
319
INDEX
343
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About the author (1990)

ROBERT E. BABE teaches in the Department of Communication, University of Ottawa.

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