Stories of Transformative Justice

Front Cover
Canadian Scholars’ Press, 2000 - Political Science - 261 pages
0 Reviews

Can justice be healing? Can crime victims find a new peace through transformative processes that include victims, offenders and community in creative solutions that enable all to grow? We can "turn irritation into iridescence," find ways to take the hard blows of life, and use the very power of our pain to grow from the experience, and create new hope beyond crime or other trauma.

Forgiveness is an untapped force in our revenge-oriented culture. These stories show that forgiveness is not condoning or forgetting, or failing to set limits. Forgiveness is recognizing and acknowledging all that was wrong, but refusing to be destroyed by it, and refusing to be drawn into a cycle of hatred and bitterness.

We can change our criminal justice system to include transformative methods. We can change our world to one with greater social and economic justice. For readers who yearn for realistic hope in these troubled times, this is a must read.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Whats Wrong with What We Have for Victims?
9
The Power of Listening
23
Chapter 3
49
Chapter 4
85
Chapter 5
113
Chapter 6
155
What about Violence and Murder?
178
Forgiving Racism and Genocide
198
Chapter 7
207
Chapter 8
221
Chapter 9
247
Bibliography
257
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

Ruth Morris is a leading authority on new approaches to criminal justice. She has worked as a university professor and social activist for more than twenty years, helping to build better local, national, and international justice systems. Her books include Crumbling Walls: Why Prisons Fail; Street People Speak; Listen Ontario!

Bibliographic information