Space, Time, and Deity: The Gifford Lectures at Glasgow, 1916-1918, Volume 1

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Macmillan, 1920 - God - 784 pages
 

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V.1
OCLC Number: 1041642
Related Subjects:(2)
Space and time.
God.
LCCN:BD
also Questia
bib: Apologetics Seminar
 

Contents

I
1
II
33
III
35
IV
65
V
93
VI
113
VII
144
VIII
165
XI
194
XII
208
XIII
238
XIV
262
XV
269
XVI
305
XVII
312
XVIII
320

IX
181
X
183

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Page 99 - The antechapel where the statue stood Of Newton with his prism and silent face, The marble index of a mind for ever Voyaging through strange seas of Thought, alone.
Page 83 - ... is really at rest, the body which relatively rests in the ship will really and absolutely move with the same velocity which the ship has on the earth. But if the earth also moves, the true and absolute motion of the body will arise, partly from the true motion of the earth in immovable space, partly from the relative motion of the ship on the earth...
Page 99 - ... not born for death, immortal Bird ! No hungry generations tread thee down ; The voice I hear this passing night was heard In ancient days by emperor and clown : Perhaps the self-same song that found a path Through the sad heart of Ruth, when sick for home, She stood in tears amid the alien corn ; The same that oft-times hath Charmed magic casements, opening on the foam Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn.
Page 113 - ... account for its formation. It is a synthesis of parts thought of as related together, perception, imagination, comparison and reasoning being analogous syntheses of parts into complex objects. The objects of any of these faculties may awaken belief or fail to awaken it ; the object of memory is only an object imagined in the past (usually very completely imagined there) to which the emotion of belief adheres.
Page 46 - Yet the two are found together in Time as we experience it. If, therefore, the past instant is not to be lost as it otherwise would be, or rather since this is not the case in fact, there must needs be some continuum other than Time which can secure and sustain the togetherness of past and future. . . . This other form of being is Space...
Page 166 - Years ago, when TH Green's ideas were most influential, I was much troubled by his criticisms of english sensationalism. One of his disciples in particular would always say to me, 'Yes! terms may indeed be possibly sensational in origin; but relations, what are they but pure acts of the intellect coming upon the sensations from above, and of a higher nature?
Page 258 - The terms are essential to the relation, and the terms do not exist. Searching without end, we never find anything more than relations ; and we see that we cannot. Space is essentially a relation of what vanishes into relations, which seek in vain for their terms. It is lengths of lengths of — nothing that we can find.
Page 65 - ... events or things, and if we are serious with Time there is no difficulty in the thought of a Space-Time which contained no matter or other qualities but was, in the language of Genesis, without form and void before there was light or sound. But though empty of qualities Space and Time are always full. Space is full of Time and Time is full of Space, and because of this each of them is a complete or perfect continuum.
Page 171 - Given a set of propositions nominally dealing with the supposed inferred entities, we observe the properties which are required of the supposed entities in order to make these propositions true. By dint of a little logical ingenuity, we then construct some logical function of less hypothetical entities which has the requisite properties. This constructed function we substitute for the supposed inferred entities, and thereby obtain a new and less doubtful interpretation of the body of propositions...
Page 13 - ... mind and the object as they are in the experience, are distinct existences united by the relation of compresence. The experience is a piece of the world consisting of these two existences in their togetherness. The one...

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