Red and Black in Haiti: Radicalism, Conflict, and Political Change, 1934-1957

Front Cover
Univ of North Carolina Press, May 15, 2009 - History - 296 pages
1 Review
In 1934 the republic of Haiti celebrated its 130th anniversary as an independent nation. In that year, too, another sort of Haitian independence occurred, as the United States ended nearly two decades of occupation. In the first comprehensive political history of postoccupation Haiti, Matthew Smith argues that the period from 1934 until the rise of dictator Francois "Papa Doc" Duvalier to the presidency in 1957 constituted modern Haiti's greatest moment of political promise.

Smith emphasizes the key role that radical groups, particularly Marxists and black nationalists, played in shaping contemporary Haitian history. These movements transformed Haiti's political culture, widened political discourse, and presented several ideological alternatives for the nation's future. They were doomed, however, by a combination of intense internal rivalries, pressures from both state authorities and the traditional elite class, and the harsh climate of U.S. anticommunism. Ultimately, the political activism of the era failed to set Haiti firmly on the path to a strong independent future.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bruchu - LibraryThing

Struggle For Radical Change In this academic study, Matthew J. Smith explores the historical processes that shaped post-occupation Haiti up until the prolonged Duvalier dictatorship. According to ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The Postoccupation Dilemma Ideology and Contention in the Vincent Years 19341941
13
Brown Power Black Protest The Lescot Regime and the Culture of Resistance 19411945
39
The Haitian Revolution of 1946
71
Now Both Sides of the Hand Have a Chance Noirisme and Opposition under Estimé 19461950
103
Blacks without Color Military Rule and Radicalism in Transition 19501957
149
Conclusion
187
Notes
197
Bibliography
243
Index
261
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Matthew J. Smith is a lecturer in the Department of History and Archaeology at the University of the West Indies at Mona, Jamaica.

Bibliographic information