Reconsidering Logical Positivism

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jul 28, 1999 - Science - 252 pages
In this collection of essays one of the preeminent philosophers of science writing today offers a reinterpretation of the enduring significance of logical positivism, the revolutionary philosophical movement centered around the Vienna Circle in the 1920s and '30s. Michael Friedman argues that the logical positivists were radicals not by presenting a new version of empiricism (as is often thought to be the case) but rather by offering a new conception of a priori knowledge and its role in empirical knowledge. This collection will be mandatory reading for any philosopher or historian of science interested in the history of logical positivism in particular or the evolution of modern philosophy in general.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

III
17
IV
34
V
44
VI
59
VII
71
VIII
89
IX
114
X
152
XI
165
XII
177
XIII
198
XIV
235
XV
245
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

Michael Friedman is a former music business executive & artist manager who has landed record deals for many prominent artists. Under his own record label, Vibra Cobra Records, he has launched the careers of several rock bands. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

Bibliographic information