Race, Space, and the Law: Unmapping a White Settler Society

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Sherene Razack
Between The Lines, 2002 - Law - 310 pages
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Race, Space, and the Law belongs to a growing field of exploration that spans critical geography, sociology, law, education, and critical race and feminist studies. Writers who share this terrain reject the idea that spaces, and the arrangement of bodies in them, emerge naturally over time. Instead, they look at how spaces are created and the role of law in shaping and supporting them. They expose hierarchies that emerge from, and in turn produce, oppressive spatial categories.
The authors' unmapping takes us through drinking establishments, parks, slums, classrooms, urban spaces of prostitution, parliaments, the main streets of cities, mosques, and the U.S.-Canada and U.S.-Mexico borders. Each example demonstrates that "place," as a Manitoba Court of Appeal judge concluded after analyzing a section of the Indian Act, "becomes race."
 

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Contents

When Place Becomes Race
1
Colonization and Indigenous Resistance in Eastern Canada
21
MixedRace Identity Liquor and the Law in British Columbia 18501913
47
Women Memory and the Subjects of the Internment
71
Discourses of Racial Domination
99
The Murder of Pamela George
121
Mapping Laws Complicity in Manitobas Racialized Spaces
157
Struggles for Urban Citizenship in Diasporic Toronto
185
Creating Regulating and Remembering the Urban Slum
211
Race Space and the Emergence of Legalized Midwifery in Ontario
233
Notes
257
Bibliography
294
Index
297
Contributors
309
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About the author (2002)

Sherene Razack teaches in the Sociology and Equity Studies in Education program at the University of Toronto.

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