Race, Gender, and the Politics of Skin Tone

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Routledge, 2005 - Social Science - 150 pages
In Race, Gender, and the Politics of Skin Tone, Margaret L. Hunter describes how colorism leads to discrimination against dark-skinned African American and Mexican American women, resulting in their lower levels of education, lower incomes, and lower status husbands. Analyzing survey data and drawing on extensive quotes from women of color, Hunter describes the personal, and often private, pain of colorism in women's lives. This book demonstrates how light-skinned women gain advantages in terms of beauty status and romantic relationships while dark-skinned women are typically viewed as more authentic members of their own racial/ethnic groups. Book jacket.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Colorstruck
1
Chapter 2 The Color of Slavery and Conquest
17
Chapter 3 Learning Earning and Marrying More
37
Chapter 4 Black and Brown Bodies Under the Knife
53
Chapter 5 The Beauty Queue Advantages of Light Skin
69
Chapter 6 The Blacker the Berry Ethnic Legitimacy and Skin Tone
93
Chapter 7 Color and the Changing Racial Landscape
111
Appendix
123
Notes
125
Bibliography
137
Index
145
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About the author (2005)

Margaret Hunter is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

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