Questioning Strategies for Teaching the Gifted

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Prufrock Press Inc., 2005 - Education - 58 pages
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In order to stimulate creative development among gifted students, the use of questioning techniques has proven to be a successful strategy for encouraging purposeful inquiry. Students need to learn to generate alternatives to solving real-world problems, and teachers can help them do this by regularly incorporating divergent questions in the classroom. Teachers can incorporate questions effectively by knowing the various purposes, types, and intended outcomes and by establishing a classroom climate that promotes active engagement, exploration, and inquiry to further student achievement.

Learn to generate classroom or small group discussions that challenge students to think critically and creatively. Elizabeth Shaunessy offers classroom-tested strategies for developing questions and activities that challenge students to think in new ways. Create a mutually respectful classroom climate and design appropriate questions to elicit higher level thinking from your students.

This is one of the books in Prufrock Press' popular Practical Strategies Series in Gifted Education. This series offers a unique collection of tightly focused books that provide a concise, practical introduction to important topics concerning the education of gifted children. The guides offer a perfect beginner's introduction to key information about gifted and talented education.

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Contents

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About the author (2005)

Frances A. Karnes, Ph.D., is a retired professor of education from The University of Southern Mississippi. They have collaborated on a number of articles and books pertaining to gifted education. Kristen R. Stephens, Ph.D., is an associate professor of the practice in the program in education at Duke University.

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