Pig Earth: Book One of the Into Their Labours Trilogy

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Jul 13, 2011 - Fiction - 210 pages
4 Reviews
With this haunting first volume of his Into Their Labours trilogy, John Berger begins his chronicle of the eclipse of peasant cultures in the twentieth century. Set in a small village in the French Alps, Pig Earth relates the stories of skeptical, hard-working men and fiercely independent women; of calves born and pigs slaughtered; of summer haymaking and long dark winters f rest; of a message of forgiveness from a dead father to his prodigal son; and of the marvelous Lucie Cabrol, exiled to a hut high in the mountains, but an inexorable part of the lives of men who have known her. Above all, this masterpiece of sensuous description and profound moral resonance is an act of reckoning that conveys the precise wealth and weight of a world we are losing.
 

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User Review  - stillatim - LibraryThing

Hey, I've got an idea! Why don't I write a trilogy of books about the French peasantry in the post-war period. And I'll combine vignettes, novellae, poems and short stories. And I'll do it all using ... Read full review

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User Review  - markalanlaidlaw - LibraryThing

I ached to have my arms in pig gore and my mind warped with gnole; truly epic writing transports all to an utterly lost world (from a suburban UK perspective anyway.) Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
7
Section 3
10
Section 4
15
Section 5
17
Section 6
22
Section 7
23
Section 8
34
Section 11
66
Section 12
69
Section 13
72
Section 14
93
Section 15
95
Section 16
123
Section 17
153
Section 18
179

Section 9
36
Section 10
52

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About the author (2011)

John Peter Berger was born in London, England on November 5, 1926. After serving in the British Army from 1944 to 1946, he enrolled in the Chelsea School of Art. He began his career as a painter and exhibited work at a number of London galleries in the late 1940s. He then worked as an art critic for The New Statesman for a decade. He wrote fiction and nonfiction including several volumes of art criticism. His novels include A Painter of Our Time, From A to X, and G., which won both the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Booker Prize in 1972. His other works include an essay collection entitled Permanent Red, Into Their Labors, and a book and television series entitled Ways of Seeing. In the 1970s, he collaborated with the director Alain Tanner on three films. He wrote or co-wrote La Salamandre, The Middle of the World, and Jonah Who Will Be 25 in the Year 2000. He died on January 1, 2017 at the age of 90.

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