Myths and Legends of the Great Plains

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Katharine Berry Judson
A.C. McClurg & Company, 1913 - Folklore - 204 pages
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Page 96 - That- wind, that wind Shakes my tipi, shakes my tipi, And sings a song for me, And sings a song for me. To the familiar this little song brings up pleasant memories of the prairie camp when the wind is whistling through the tipi poles and blowing the flaps about, while inside the fire burns bright and the song and the game go round.
Page 50 - A'te he'ye lo, a'te he'ye lo. The whole world is coming, A nation is coming, a natiou is coming, The Eagle has brought the message to the tribe. The father says so, the father says so. Over the whole earth they are coming. The buffalo are coming, the buffalo are coming, The Crow has brought the message to the tribe, The father gays so, the father says so. This fine song summarizes the whole hope of the Ghost dance...
Page 75 - I O'er the prairie flits in ever widening circles the shadow of a bird about me as I walk; Upward turn my eyes, Kawas looks upon me, she turns with flapping wings and far away she flies. II...
Page 23 - ... buzzards we see now. He flew all over the earth, low down near the ground, and it was still soft. When he reached the Cherokee country, he was very tired, and his wings began to flap and strike the ground, and wherever they struck the earth there was a valley, and where they turned up again there was a mountain. When the animals above saw this, they were afraid that the whole world would be mountains, so they called him back, but the Cherokee country remains full of mountains to this day.
Page 92 - When as we travel we come to mountains or hills we sing the following song. Hills were made by Tira'wa. We ascend hills when we go away alone to pray. From the top of a hill we can look over the country to see if there are enemies in sight or if any danger is near us; we can see if we are to meet friends. The hills help man, so we sing to them.
Page 30 - Climber," offered to go for fire. He swam over to the island and climbed up the tree on the outside, as* the blacksnake always does, but when he put his head down into the hole the smoke choked him so that he fell into the burning stump, and before he could climb out again he was as black as the Uksu'hi.
Page 44 - ... the tree stands burning, but no one can see the fire except at night." When the chiefs heard this tale, they sent runners to see what...
Page 23 - Buzzard and told him to go and make ready for them. This was the Great Buzzard, the father of all the buzzards we see now. He flew all over the earth, low down near the ground, and it was still soft. When he reached the Cherokee country, he was very tired, and his wings began to flap and strike the ground, and wherever they struck the earth there was a valley, and where they turned up again there was a mountain.
Page 23 - Tsiska'gili', the Red Crawfish, had his shell scorched a bright red, so that his meat was spoiled: and the Cherokee do not eat it. The conjurers put the sun another hand-breadth higher in the air, but it was still too hot. They raised it another time, and another...
Page 48 - ... birds. The great bird, they say, gives the first sound, and the young ones repeat it; this is the cause of the reverberations. The Sioux declare that the young thunderers do all the mischief, like giddy youth who will not listen to good advice; but the old...

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