More Happy Than Not (Deluxe Edition)

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Soho Press, Jun 2, 2015 - Young Adult Fiction - 336 pages
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In his twisty, gritty, profoundly moving New York Times bestselling-debut—also called “mandatory reading” and selected as an Editors' Choice by the New York Times—Adam Silvera brings to life a charged, dangerous near-future summer in the Bronx.

In the months after his father's suicide, it's been tough for sixteen-year-old Aaron Soto to find happiness again—but he's still gunning for it. With the support of his girlfriend Genevieve and his overworked mom, he's slowly remembering what that might feel like. But grief and the smile-shaped scar on his wrist prevent him from forgetting completely.á

When Genevieve leaves for a couple of weeks, Aaron spends all his time hanging out with this new guy, Thomas. Aaron's crew notices, and they're not exactly thrilled. But Aaron can't deny the happiness Thomas brings or how Thomas makes him feel safe from himself, despite the tensions their friendship is stirring with his girlfriend and friends. Since Aaron can't stay away from Thomas or turn off his newfound feelings for him, he considers turning to the Leteo Institute's revolutionary memory-alteration procedure to straighten himself out, even if it means forgetting who he truly is.á

Why does happiness have to be so hard?

“Silvera managed to leave me smiling after totally breaking my heart. Unforgettable.”
—Becky Albertalli, author of Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agendaá

"Adam Silvera explores the inner workings of a painful world and he delivers this with heartfelt honesty and a courageous, confident hand . . . A mesmerizing, unforgettable tour de force."
—John Corey Whaley, National Book Award finalist and author of Where Things Come Back and Nogginá
 

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MORE HAPPY THAN NOT

User Review  - Kirkus

In a Bronx neighborhood of the near future, it's no secret that at least one person has taken advantage of the Leteo Institute's new medical procedure that promises "cutting-edge memory-relief ... Read full review

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The story itself was great, and the way the plot unfolded – expert! However the narration felt cumbersome. Sometimes the material was a little in your face, but if fits with the setting of More Happy Than Not: future Brooklyn is rough and still has a deep-seated old timey sense of morality, making it detrimental to your wellbeing if you stray from the norm. That clashed a little with the youngsters casual attitude towards sex, but not sexuality… for a technological developed society all of these aspects did not gel together well for me.
Aaron Soto is wonderfully cute, altruistic and na´ve. He has this purity of spirit whereby he navigated the world with a moral compass, somehow always guiding him to ‘true north.’ Like any journey, there are obstacles to overcome, and even those are unique in this story. I did get plenty of small surprises, but guessed the plot well in advance.
Thomas was adorable, and surprisingly non-pressuring for his age. It was refreshing to have a cast painted so realistically where you could find aspects to like and dislike for all. It really enhances the reading experience.
More Happy Than Not makes a quaint point in the face of self-acceptance. It reminds me of the day of reprogramming camps for gay and lesbians, except approached with a sci-fi angle. Such a wonderfully unique storytelling device.
Pacing felt a little slow, scattered with seeming inconsequential facts and side notes. In hindsight, a re-read would illuminate their presence, but from my initial experience, the writing style felt clunky and frequently meandering.
I’d recommend this to glbt and sci-fi fans alike. It’s an interesting novel apart from your typical futuristic or dystopian type of novel.
 

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
17
Section 4
25
Section 5
45
Section 6
61
Section 7
63
Section 8
79
Section 21
155
Section 22
173
Section 23
211
Section 24
217
Section 25
221
Section 26
225
Section 27
229
Section 28
239

Section 9
83
Section 10
87
Section 11
95
Section 12
101
Section 13
107
Section 14
111
Section 15
123
Section 16
127
Section 17
137
Section 18
141
Section 19
145
Section 20
151
Section 29
245
Section 30
249
Section 31
255
Section 32
257
Section 33
263
Section 34
267
Section 35
273
Section 36
277
Section 37
279
Section 38
283
Section 39
289
Copyright

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About the author (2015)

Adam Silvera was born and raised in the Bronx. He has worked as a bookseller, as a community manager at a literary development company, and as a reviewer of children’s and young adult novels. His highly acclaimed debut novel, More Happy Than Not, was followed by History Is All You Left Me and the New York Times bestsellers They Both Die at the End and Infinity Son. He lives in Los Angeles and is tall for no reason.

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